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Newnes Interfacing Companion

Book Description

Tony Fischer-Cripps is a Project Leader in the Division of Telecommunications and Industrial Physics of the CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organisation), Australia. He was previously lecturer, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), Australia, and has also worked for the National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA (NIST, formerly National Bureau of Standards - NBS).

*The essential pocket reference for engineers and students
*Interfacing in action: PCs, PLCs, transducers and instrumentation in one book
*Develop systems and applications that work with Newnes Interfacing Companion

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Dedication
  5. Copyright
  6. Preface
  7. Part 1: Transducers
    1. Introduction to Transducers
      1. 1.0 Transducers
    2. Chapter 1.1: Measurement systems
      1. 1.1.1 Transducers
      2. 1.1.2 Methods of measurement
      3. 1.1.3 Sensitivity
      4. 1.1.4 Zero, linearity and span
      5. 1.1.5 Resolution, hysteresis and error
      6. 1.1.6 Fourier analysis
      7. 1.1.7 Dynamic response
      8. 1.1.8 PID control
      9. 1.1.9 Accuracy and repeatability
      10. 1.1.10 Mechanical models
    3. Chapter 1.2: Temperature
      1. 1.2.1 Temperature
      2. 1.2.2 Standard thermometers
      3. 1.2.3 Industrial thermometers
      4. 1.2.4 Platinum resistance thermometer
      5. 1.2.5 Liquid-in-glass thermometer
      6. 1.2.6 Radiation pyrometer
      7. 1.2.7 Thermocouple
      8. 1.2.8 Thermistors
      9. 1.2.9 Relative humidity
      10. 1.2.11 Activities
    4. Chapter 1.3: Light
      1. 1.3.1 Light
      2. 1.3.2 Measuring light
      3. 1.3.3 Standards of measurement
      4. 1.3.4 Thermal detectors
      5. 1.3.5 Light dependent resistor (LDR)
      6. 1.3.6 Photodiode
      7. 1.3.7 Other semiconductor photodetectors
      8. 1.3.8 Optical detectors
      9. 1.3.9 Photomultiplier
    5. Chapter 1.4: Position and motion
      1. 1.4.1 Mechanical switch
      2. 1.4.2 Potentiometric sensor
      3. 1.4.3 Capacitive transducer
      4. 1.4.4 LVDT
      5. 1.4.5 Angular velocity transducer
      6. 1.4.6 Position sensitive diode array
      7. 1.4.7 Motion control
    6. Chapter 1.5: Force, pressure and flow
      1. 1.5.1 Strain gauge
      2. 1.5.2 Force
      3. 1.5.3 Piezoelectric sensor instrumentation
      4. 1.5.4 Acceleration and vibration
      5. 1.5.5 Mass
      6. 1.5.6 Atmospheric pressure
      7. 1.5.7 Pressure
      8. 1.5.8 Industrial pressure measurement
      9. 1.5.9 Sound
      10. 1.5.10 Flow
      11. 1.5.11 Level
  8. Part 2: Interfacing
    1. Introduction to Interfacing
      1. 2.0 Interfacing
    2. Chapter 2.1: Number systems
      1. 2.1.1 Binary number system
      2. 2.1.2 Decimal to binary conversion
      3. 2.1.3 Hexadecimal
      4. 2.1.4 Decimal to hex conversion
      5. 2.1.5 2’s complement
      6. 2.1.6 Signed numbers
      7. 2.1.7 Subtraction and multiplication
      8. 2.1.8 Binary coded decimal (BCD)
      9. 2.1.9 Gray code
      10. 2.1.10 ASCII code
      11. 2.1.11 Boolean algebra
      12. 2.1.12 Digital logic circuits
      13. 2.1.14 Activities
    3. Chapter 2.2: Computer architecture
      1. 2.2.1 Computer architecture
      2. 2.2.2 Memory
      3. 2.2.3 Segmented memory
      4. 2.2.4 Memory data
      5. 2.2.5 Buffers
      6. 2.2.6 Latches
      7. 2.2.7 Flip-flop
      8. 2.2.8 Input/Output (I/O)
      9. 2.2.9 Microprocessor unit (MPU/CPU)
      10. 2.2.10 Registers
      11. 2.2.11 ROM
      12. 2.2.12 Interrupts
      13. 2.2.13 Memory map
      14. 2.2.14 Real and protected mode CPU operation
      15. 2.2.16 Activities
    4. Chapter 2.3: Assembly language
      1. 2.3.1 Instruction set
      2. 2.3.2 Assembly language
      3. 2.3.3 Program execution
      4. 2.3.4 Assembly language program structure
      5. 2.3.5 Assembler directives
      6. 2.3.6 Code segment
      7. 2.3.7 Assembly language shell program
      8. 2.3.8 Branching
      9. 2.3.9 Register and immediate addressing
      10. 2.3.10 Memory addressing
      11. 2.3.11 Indirect memory addressing
      12. 2.3.12 Indexed memory addressing
      13. 2.3.14 Interrupts
      14. 2.3.16 Activities
    5. Chapter 2.4: Interfacing
      1. 2.4.1 Interfacing
      2. 2.4.2 Input/Output ports
      3. 2.4.3 Polling
      4. 2.4.4 Interrupts
      5. 2.4.5 Direct memory access (DMA)
      6. 2.4.6 Serial port
      7. 2.4.7 Serial port addresses
      8. 2.4.8 Serial port registers
      9. 2.4.9 Serial port registers and interrupts
      10. 2.4.10 Serial port baud rate
      11. 2.4.11 Serial port operation
      12. 2.4.12 Parallel printer port
      13. 2.4.13 Parallel port registers
      14. 2.4.14 Parallel printer port operation
    6. Chapter 2.5: A to D and D to A conversions
      1. 2.5.1 Interfacing
      2. 2.5.2 The Nyquist criterion
      3. 2.5.3 Resolution and quantisation noise
      4. 2.5.4 Oversampling
      5. 2.5.5 Analog to digital converters
      6. 2.5.6 ADC (integrating method)
      7. 2.5.7 ADC (successive approximation)
      8. 2.5.8 Aperture error
      9. 2.5.9 ADC08xx chip
      10. 2.5.10 Sample-and-hold
      11. 2.5.11 Sample-and-hold control
      12. 2.5.12 Digital to analog conversion
      13. 2.5.13 DAC0800
      14. 2.5.14 Data acquisition board
    7. Chapter 2.6: Data communications
      1. 2.6.1 Communications
      2. 2.6.2 Byte to serial conversion
      3. 2.6.3 RS232 interface
      4. 2.6.4 Synchronisation
      5. 2.6.5 UART (6402)
      6. 2.6.7 Line drivers
      7. 2.6.8 UART clock
      8. 2.6.9 UART Master Reset
      9. 2.6.10 Null modem
      10. 2.6.11 Serial port BIOS services
      11. 2.6.12 Serial port operation in BASIC
      12. 2.6.13 Hardware handshaking
      13. 2.6.14 RS485
      14. 2.6.15 GPIB
      15. 2.6.16 USB
      16. 2.6.17 TCP/IP
    8. Chapter 2.7: Programmable logic controllers
      1. 2.7.1 Programmable logic controllers
      2. 2.7.2 Timing
      3. 2.7.3 Functional components
      4. 2.7.4 Programming
      5. 2.7.5 Ladder logic diagrams
      6. 2.7.6 PLC specifications
    9. Chapter 2.8: Data acquisition project
      1. 2.8.1 Serial data acquisition system
      2. 2.8.2 Circuit construction
      3. 2.8.3 Programming
      4. 2.8.4 Sample-and-hold
      5. 2.8.5 Digital to analog system
  9. Part 3: Signal processing
    1. Introduction to Signal processing
      1. 3.0 Signal processing
    2. Chapter 3.1: Transfer function
      1. 3.1.1 Instrumentation
      2. 3.1.2 Transfer function
      3. 3.1.3 Transforms
      4. 3.1.4 Laplace transform
      5. 3.1.5 Operator notation
      6. 3.1.6 Differential operator
      7. 3.1.7 Integrator – passive
      8. 3.1.8 Differentiator – passive
      9. 3.1.9 Transfer impedance
      10. 3.1.11 Activities
    3. Chapter 3.2: Active filters
      1. 3.2.1 Filters
      2. 3.2.2 T –network filters
      3. 3.2.3 Twin-T filter
      4. 3.2.4 Active integrator/differentiator
      5. 3.2.5 Integrator transfer function
      6. 3.2.6 Low pass filter – active
      7. 3.2.7 2nd order active filter
      8. 3.2.8 Double integrator
      9. 3.2.9 Bandpass filter – narrow
      10. 3.2.10 Differentiator transfer function
      11. 3.2.11 High pass filter – active
      12. 3.2.12 High pass filter – ω-domain
      13. 3.2.13 Bandpass filter – wide
      14. 3.2.14 Voltage gain and dB
      15. 3.2.16 Activities
    4. Chapter 3.3: Instrumentation amplifier
      1. 3.3.1 Difference amplifier
      2. 3.3.2 CMRR
      3. 3.3.3 Difference amplifier with voltage follower inputs
      4. 3.3.4 Difference amplifier with cross-coupled inputs
      5. 3.3.5 CMRR cross-coupled inputs
      6. 3.3.6 Instrumentation amplifier
      7. 3.3.7 Log amplifier
      8. 3.3.8 Op-amp frequency response
      9. 3.3.10 Activities
    5. Chapter 3.4: Noise
      1. 3.4.1 Intrinsic noise
      2. 3.4.2 Environmental noise
      3. 3.4.3 Signal-to-noise ratio
      4. 3.4.4 Optical detectors
      5. 3.4.5 Lock-in amplifier
      6. 3.4.6 Correlation
    6. Chapter 3.5: Digital signal processing
      1. 3.5.1 Digital filters
      2. 3.5.2 Fourier series
      3. 3.5.3 Fourier transform
      4. 3.5.4 Sampling
      5. 3.5.5 Discrete Fourier transform
      6. 3.5.6 Filtering
      7. 3.5.7 Digital filtering (ω-domain)
      8. 3.5.8 Convolution
      9. 3.5.9 Discrete convolution
      10. 3.5.10 Digital filtering (t-domain)
      11. 3.5.11 Example
      12. 3.5.12 Smoothing transfer function
      13. 3.5.14 Activities
  10. Index
  11. Further reading
  12. Parts lists