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Optical Sources, Detectors, and Systems

Book Description

Optical Sources, Detectors, and Systems presents a unified approach, from the applied engineering point of view, to radiometry, optical devices, sources, and receivers. One of the most important and unique features of the book is that it combines modern optics, electric circuits, and system analysis into a unified, comprehensive treatment.

Table of Contents

  1. Front Cover
  2. Optical Sources, Detectors, and Systems
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Contents
  5. Preface
  6. Symbols
  7. Chapter 1. Blackbody Radiation, Image Plane Intensity, and Units
    1. 1.1 Planck's Law (1/2)
    2. 1.1 Planck's Law (2/2)
    3. 1.2 Energy Flow, Absorption, and Emission
    4. 1.3 The Stefan-Boltzmann Law
    5. 1.4 Image Intensity in an Optical Receiver
    6. 1.5 Units and Intensity Calculations (1/2)
    7. 1.5 Units and Intensity Calculations (2/2)
    8. Problems
  8. Chapter 2. Interaction of Radiation with Matter: Absorption, Emission, and Lasers
    1. 2.1 The Einstein A and B Coefficients and Stimulated Emission
    2. 2.2 Absorption or Amplification of Optical Waves
    3. 2.3 Electron or Fermi-Dirac Statistics
    4. 2.4 The Fabry-Perot Resonator
    5. 2.5 Inversion Techniques
    6. Problems
  9. Chapter 3. The Semiconductor Laser
    1. 3.1 Electron State Density versus Energy in Semiconductors
    2. 3.2 Gain Coefficient (1/2)
    3. 3.2 Gain Coefficient (2/2)
    4. 3.3 Laser Structures and Their Parameters (1/2)
    5. 3.3 Laser Structures and Their Parameters (2/2)
    6. 3.4 Laser Beamwidth and the Fraunhofer Transform (1/2)
    7. 3.4 Laser Beamwidth and the Fraunhofer Transform (2/2)
    8. Problems
  10. Chapter 4. The Ideal Photon Detector and Noise Limitations on Optical Signal Measurement
    1. 4.1 The Ideal Photon Detector and Shot Noise
    2. 4.2 The Detector Circuit: Resistor and Amplifier Noise
    3. 4.3 The Transimpedance Amplifier
    4. 4.4 Signal-to-Noise Voltage and Noise Equivalent Power
    5. 4.5 The Integrating Amplifier: Sampled Data Systems and Noise Equivalent Electron Count
    6. 4.6 Effective Input Noise Current, Responsivity, and Detectivity
    7. 4.7 General Signal-to-Noise Expression for Combined Signal, Background, and Amplifier Noise
    8. Problems
  11. Chapter 5. Real Detectors: Vacuum Photodiodes and Photomultipliers, Photoconductors, Junction Photodiodes, and Avalanche Photodiodes
    1. 5.1 Vacuum Photodiode and Photomultiplier
    2. 5.2 Semiconductors: Photoconductors and Photodiodes (1/2)
    3. 5.2 Semiconductors: Photoconductors and Photodiodes (2/2)
    4. 5.3 Avalanche Photodiodes (1/3)
    5. 5.3 Avalanche Photodiodes (2/3)
    6. 5.3 Avalanche Photodiodes (3/3)
    7. Problems
  12. Chapter 6. Heterodyne or Coherent Detection and Optical Amplification
    1. 6.1 Simple Plane Wave Analysis
    2. 6.2 Heterodyne Detection with Arbitrary Wavefronts
    3. 6.3 Siegman's Antenna Theorem
    4. 6.4 Optical Amplification with Heterodyne Detection (1/2)
    5. 6.4 Optical Amplification with Heterodyne Detection (2/2)
    6. 6.5 Optical amplification with Direct Detection
    7. Problems
  13. Chapter 7. Systems I: Radiometry, Communications, and Radar
    1. 7.1 Radiometry
    2. 7.2 Optical Communication: Direct Detection (1/2)
    3. 7.2 Optical Communication: Direct Detection (2/2)
    4. 7.3 Optical Communication: Heterodyne Detection
    5. 7.4 Radar (1/3)
    6. 7.4 Radar (2/3)
    7. 7.4 Radar (3/3)
    8. 7.5 Atmospheric Effects
    9. Problems
  14. Chapters 8. Systems II: Imaging
    1. 8.1 Photoemissive Image Tubes
    2. 8.2 Photoconductive Image Tubes
    3. 8.3 Detector Arrays
    4. 8.4 Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) Arrays
  15. Appendix A: Answers to Problems
  16. References
  17. Index