(Ray)
(Fogra 29_WF)Job:05-30625 Title:RP-Paint Lab
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(Ray)
(Fogra 29_WF)Job:05-30625 Title:RP-Paint Lab
#175 Dtp:225 Page:63
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Paint Lab
WHat: ExPLoring Your ME dia
62
(Text)
Materials
Aluminum ashing in the hardware store sparked the idea for this painting Lab. Luckily it
comes thin enough so that you can cut it with scissors and easily hammer it onto wood. This
technique is akin to inking up an etching plate, or you can paint more heavily onto it if desired.
The metal lends an industrial sturdiness to the work that is a nice departure from a regular
canvas texture.
2
1
LAB
Painting on Metal
thin-gauge aluminum sheeting
(used for chimney and roof
ashing)
wood surface, thicker than
your nail lengths (1" [2.5 cm]
plywood works great)
heavy-duty metal cutting
scissors
white latex enamel paint
various nail heads (such as
carpet tacks and brads)
hammer
oil paint
Above: Pears, oil and metal on panel
Top left: Falling Bowls, oil and metal on panel
1. After selecting your wood surface, start
cutting, layering, and nailing the metal
sheeting in various forms for the
background (g. 1).
2. Experiment with banging the nails
sideways into the board as well as
straight down. Try using the back of
your hammer to dent and add texture
to the metal (g. 2). You can also use
a metal brush to scuff the surface.
Use different nail head sizes for shape
interest.
3. Cut shapes from the metal to layer
on this background (g. 3). Once
complete, prime the whole surface with
white latex enamel paint (g. 4).
4. Once the enamel is bone dry, begin
to paint onto the surface and
experiment with rubbing the paint over
the texture to capture all of the nooks,
crannies, bumps, and nicks on the
surface (g. 5).
Fig. 1
Let’s Go!
(Ray)
(Fogra 29_WF)Job:05-30625 Title:RP-Paint Lab
#175 Dtp:225 Page:62
040-069_30625.indd 62 5/31/13 2:25 PM
Paint Lab WHat: ExPLoring Your ME dia
63
(Text)
Aluminum ashing in the hardware store sparked the idea for this painting Lab. Luckily it
comes thin enough so that you can cut it with scissors and easily hammer it onto wood. This
technique is akin to inking up an etching plate, or you can paint more heavily onto it if desired.
The metal lends an industrial sturdiness to the work that is a nice departure from a regular
canvas texture.
Painting on Metal
Tips
Be careful when working with thin metal
sheets—the edges can be very sharp!
Wear gloves when cutting.
Hammering and nailing is a great way to
add texture to the metal. The dents and
nicks capture the paint beautifully.
Take It Further
Try applying the metal in a bent and
curved fashion to create a semi-relief
sculptural form in the piece.
1. After selecting your wood surface, start
cutting, layering, and nailing the metal
sheeting in various forms for the
background (g. 1).
2. Experiment with banging the nails
sideways into the board as well as
straight down. Try using the back of
your hammer to dent and add texture
to the metal (g. 2). You can also use
a metal brush to scuff the surface.
Use different nail head sizes for shape
interest.
3. Cut shapes from the metal to layer
on this background (g. 3). Once
complete, prime the whole surface with
white latex enamel paint (g. 4).
4. Once the enamel is bone dry, begin
to paint onto the surface and
experiment with rubbing the paint over
the texture to capture all of the nooks,
crannies, bumps, and nicks on the
surface (g. 5).
Fig. 1 Fig. 2
Fig. 5
Fig. 3
Fig. 4
Let’s Go!
(Ray)
(Fogra 29_WF)Job:05-30625 Title:RP-Paint Lab
#175 Dtp:225 Page:63
040-069_30625.indd 63 5/31/13 2:25 PM

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