O'Reilly logo

Panic! UNIX® System Crash Dump Analysis by Kimberley Brown, Chris Drake

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Chapter 29. Multiprocessor Kernels

Early computers, and early UNIX systems, were designed with one main processor. In order to handle lots of “simultaneous” jobs, the kernel would rapidly switch back and forth between tasks, or processes, giving each a small slice of time, which gave the illusion of simultaneous, parallel activity. This was known as timesharing. A single task would only be interrupted and stopped if it needed a resource or some data that was not available (for example, if it requested input from a tape drive) or if it exceeded its time slice and another task needed to run.

The UNIX kernel was designed to fit this model. A process would run until it ran out of time or until it issued a system request that resulted in the process ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required