Chapter 3. Ford's Theatre

Ford's Theatre

Ford's Theatre seen from along 10th St NW. Taken at ISO 3200, f/4 1/40 second with a 50mm lens.

Why It's Worth a Photograph

Originally known as Ford's Athenaeum, this theater in downtown Washington, D.C., is remembered for a singular tragic event — the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. John Wilkes Booth, a famous actor and staunch supporter of slavery and the Confederacy, shot President Lincoln in the back of his head during a play at Ford's Theatre. President Lincoln died the next morning at 7 a.m. in the Petersen House across the street.

The Petersen House is preserved and furnished with artifacts from the time. It's a small, narrow space where you can see the home's parlor, living area, and the room in which President Lincoln died.

The best locations from which to photograph Ford's Theatre: (A) interior of Ford's Theatre, (B) exterior of Ford's Theatre on 10th St. NW, and (C) interior of Petersen House. Nearby photo ops: (10) National Archives, (11) National Mall, (14) Old Post Office, (27) Washington Monument, and (28) White House and President's Park.

Figure 3.1. The best locations from which to photograph Ford's Theatre: (A) interior of Ford's Theatre, (B) exterior of Ford's Theatre on 10th St. NW, and (C) interior of Petersen House. Nearby photo ops: (10) National Archives, (11) National Mall, (14) Old Post Office, (27) Washington Monument, and (28) White House and President's Park.

Where Can I Get the Best Shot?

You can get great photos of Ford's Theatre both inside and out. For capturing images of the room where Lincoln died, visit Petersen House across ...

Get Photographing Washington, D.C.: Digital Field Guide now with the O’Reilly learning platform.

O’Reilly members experience live online training, plus books, videos, and digital content from nearly 200 publishers.