Appendix E. .NET DateTime Formatting

DateTime format strings convert a DateTime object to one of several standard formats, as listed in Table E-1.

Table E-1. Standard DateTime format strings
Format specifier Name Description

d

Short date

The culture’s short date format:

PS > "{0:d}" -f [DateTime] "01/23/4567"
1/23/4567

D

Long date

The culture’s long date format:

PS > "{0:D}" -f [DateTime] "01/23/4567"
Friday, January 23, 4567

f

Full date/short time

Combines the long date and short time format patterns:

PS > "{0:f}" -f [DateTime] "01/23/4567"
Friday, January 23, 4567 12:00 AM

F

Full date/long time

Combines the long date and long time format patterns:

PS > "{0:F}" -f [DateTime] "01/23/4567"
Friday, January 23, 4567 12:00:00 AM

g

General date/ short time

Combines the short date and short time format patterns:

PS > "{0:g}" -f [DateTime] "01/23/4567"
1/23/4567 12:00 AM

G

General date/long time

Combines the short date and long time format patterns:

PS > "{0:G}" -f [DateTime] "01/23/4567"
1/23/4567 12:00:00 AM

M or m

Month day

The culture’s MonthDay format:

PS > "{0:M}" -f [DateTime] "01/23/4567"
January 23

o

Round-trip date/time

The date formatted with a pattern that guarantees the string (when parsed) will result in the original DateTime again:

PS > "{0:o}" -f [DateTime] "01/23/4567"
4567-01-23T00:00:00.0000000

R or r

RFC1123

The standard RFC1123 format pattern:

PS > "{0:R}" -f [DateTime] "01/23/4567"
Fri, 23 Jan 4567 00:00:00 GMT

Get PowerShell Cookbook, 4th Edition now with O’Reilly online learning.

O’Reilly members experience live online training, plus books, videos, and digital content from 200+ publishers.