CHAPTER 3: Establishing a Color ManagementFriendly Workflow
40
Initially, calibrating some output devices
may require a fair amount of work,
but once calibration and pro ling are
established, they’re easy to maintain. You
may be outputting to an ink-jet printer,
a dye sub, a photographic lab, a toner-
based color copier, or a printing press. Or
you may be outputting to the Web.
Preparing a File for Output
Regardless of the nal destination, there
are three areas of transition that your
le may need to go through during the
output phase: resolution, sharpening, and
color space conversion. These tasks can
be performed manually in Photoshop or
automatically within a driver or software
known as a RIP (Raster Image Processor).
(Rick will discuss RIPs in detail in
Chapter 5.)
Resolution
Take, for example, a 36MB  le that
you’ve processed and are now ready
to send to your photographic lab.
The resolution from this  le is easily
suitable for a 16 x 20 size print with
little or no resolution changes. If
the  le is going to be printed at 30 x
40, then the  le resolution must be
resampled to match the set resolution
of the printing device, which could
require the  le size to rise to 80–
140MB. Resampling can be achieved in
Photoshop under Image Image Size.
Output Stage
Output is perhaps the easiest stage with regard to maintaining
consistency. The challenge is to calibrate and pro le your
devices and maintain them. The ultimate goal of any digital
work ow is the  nal product. You want to make sure that the
image is printed or electronically displayed correctly.
© Eddie Tapp
ETCM_book.indb 40 10/6/06 4:43:31 PM
Sharpening
Sharpening an image requires an
increasing contrast of pixel data, thus
removing pixel data in the process.
Because of this data loss, sharpening
for output should be one of the
very last steps and established for a
particular output size. (See the section
“Sharpening” later in this chapter.)
Converting color space
Converting the color space of the
le to the color space of the printer
is when color management is truly
performed.
The good news is that, in most cases,
when you send your 36MB RGB  le to
your lab, it will use a software RIP that
automatically performs these three
important steps.
With an in-house work ow to your own
output device, you have several options
to automate the output stage. You can
create an action in Photoshop that will
resample the image (if needed), sharpen
it, and bring up the “Print with Preview”
window, at which point you can select
the output pro le for your ink/paper
combination and then establish the print
driver interface. Or you can use a software
RIP to apply these same options (more on
this in Chapter 4).
Archive your processed and original files
prior to the output stage. Once your
files have been resized, sharpened,
and color space converted to an output
device, they can be used only for that
specific output in the future.
Archive your processed and original files
prior to the output stage. Once your
files have been resized, sharpened,
and color space converted to an output
device, they can be used only for that
specific output in the future.
Archive your processed and original files
prior to the output stage. Once your
files have been resized, sharpened,
and color space converted to an output
device, they can be used only for that
specific output in the future.
© Eddie Tapp
© Eddie Tapp
Output Stage
41
ETCM_book.indb 41 10/6/06 4:44:22 PM

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