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Practical E-Manufacturing and Supply Chain Management

Book Description

New technologies are revolutionising the way manufacturing and supply chain management are implemented. These changes are delivering manufacturing firms the competitive advantage of a highly flexible and responsive supply chain and manufacturing system to ensure that they meet the high expectations of their customers, who, in today's economy, demand absolutely the best service, price, delivery time and product quality.

To make e-manufacturing and supply chain technologies effective, integration is needed between various, often disparate systems. To understand why this is such an issue, one needs to understand what the different systems or system components do, their objectives, their specific focus areas and how they interact with other systems. It is also required to understand how these systems evolved to their current state, as the concepts used during the early development of systems and technology tend to remain in place throughout the life-cycle of the systems/technology.

This book explores various standards, concepts and techniques used over the years to model systems and hierarchies in order to understand where they fit into the organization and supply chain. It looks at the specific system components and the ways in which they can be designed and graphically depicted for easy understanding by both information technology (IT) and non-IT personnel.

Without a good implementation philosophy, very few systems add any real benefit to an organization, and for this reason the ways in which systems are implemented and installation projects managed are also explored and recommendations are made as to possible methods that have proven successful in the past. The human factor and how that impacts on system success are also addressed, as is the motivation for system investment and subsequent benefit measurement processes.

Finally, the vendor/user supply/demand within the e-manufacturing domain is explored and a method is put forward that enables the reduction of vendor bias during the vendor selection process.

The objective of this book is to provide the reader with a good understanding regarding the four critical factors (business/physical processes, systems supporting the processes, company personnel and company/personal performance measures) that influence the success of any e-manufacturing implementation, and the synchronization required between these factors.

· Discover how to implement the flexible and responsive supply chain and manufacturing execution systems required for competitive and customer-focused manufacturing
· Build a working knowledge of the latest plant automation, manufacturing execution systems (MES) and supply chain management (SCM) design techniques
· Gain a fuller understanding of the four critical factors (business and physical processes, systems supporting the processes, company personnel, performance measurement) that influence the success of any e-manufacturing implementation, and how to evaluate and optimize all four factors

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Other titles in the series
  5. Copyright
  6. Preface
  7. Disclaimer
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Who is Altech Informatics?
  10. Chapter 1: Introduction to e-manufacturing systems
    1. 1.1 Preamble
    2. 1.2 E-manufacturing definition
    3. 1.3 Background
    4. 1.4 E-manufacturing strategy
    5. 1.5 E-manufacturing challenges
    6. 1.6 E-manufacturing benefits
    7. 1.7 E-manufacturing and supply chain
  11. Chapter 2: History of business automation
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 Evolution of measurement instrumentation
    3. 2.3 Evolution of control systems
    4. 2.4 Evolution of process visualization systems
    5. 2.5 The evolution of accounting systems
    6. 2.6 Evolution of computers
    7. 2.7 Evolution of networks
    8. 2.8 Evolution of the Internet
    9. 2.9 Development of supply-chain management systems
    10. 2.10 Evolution of manufacturing execution systems
  12. Chapter 3: System hierarchies and components
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 Programmable logic controllers
    3. 3.3 Distributed control system
    4. 3.4 SCADA System
    5. 3.5 DCS and SCADA/PLC comparison
    6. 3.6 Hybrid control systems
    7. 3.7 Manufacturing execution systems
    8. 3.8 Enterprise resource planning systems
    9. 3.9 ERP and SCM relationship
    10. 3.10 Supply chain management
    11. 3.11 Operation management systems
    12. 3.12 Holonic manufacturing system
    13. 3.13 Collaborative manufacturing management systems
  13. Chapter 4: Business process design models and concepts used in operations systems
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Theory of constraints
    3. 4.3 The supply-chain operation reference model
    4. 4.4 The ready, execute, process, analyze, coordinate model
    5. 4.5 Introduction to the IEC (6)1131-3 standard
    6. 4.6 S88 batch control standard
    7. 4.7 S95 Enterprise-Control System Integration Standard
    8. 4.8 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Title 21 part 11
    9. 4.9 Continuous improvement (Kaizen)
  14. Chapter 5: Business process and system modeling tools and packages
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 Generic BMTs
    3. 5.3 IDEF0
    4. 5.4 Unified modeling language
    5. 5.5 Computer-aided software engineering tools
    6. 5.6 ARIS
    7. 5.7 VISIO
    8. 5.8 Oracle Designer
    9. 5.9 Bpwin
  15. Chapter 6: Enterprise planning and supply-chain interaction
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Logistics planning and optimization
    3. 6.3 E-fulfillment
    4. 6.4 Business process optimization
    5. 6.5 Procurement management
    6. 6.6 Supplier relationship management
    7. 6.7 Customer relationship management
    8. 6.8 Material returns management
  16. Chapter 7: Product and plant knowledge management
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 Product life cycle management
    3. 7.3 Quality management
    4. 7.4 Laboratory information management systems
    5. 7.5 Document management
  17. Chapter 8: Production capability management
    1. 8.1 Introduction
    2. 8.2 Labor management
    3. 8.3 Equipment management
    4. 8.4 Material storage and availability management
    5. 8.5 Lean manufacturing
  18. Chapter 9: Production scheduling, management and control
    1. 9.1 Introduction
    2. 9.2 Enterprise scheduling
    3. 9.3 Finite capacity scheduling
    4. 9.4 Dispatching production units
    5. 9.5 Resource allocation
    6. 9.6 Process management
    7. 9.7 Production systems collaboration
  19. Chapter 10: Production data collection and performance analysis
    1. 10.1 Introduction
    2. 10.2 Changing face of manufacturing strategies
    3. 10.3 Performance analysis strategies
    4. 10.4 Performance analysis systems
    5. 10.5 Performance analysis concepts
    6. 10.6 Outcome metrics
    7. 10.7 Product tracking and genealogy
    8. 10.8 Data collection/acquisition
  20. Chapter 11: Project motivation and benefit quantification
    1. 11.1 Introduction
    2. 11.2 Project portfolio
    3. 11.3 Project motivation
    4. 11.4 Potential benefits
    5. 11.5 Benefits of IT architecture components
    6. 11.6 Benefit quantification
    7. 11.7 Benefits and architectural levels
    8. 11.8 Extended benefit analysis
    9. 11.9 Benefits of an extended business case
    10. 11.10 Benefit examples
    11. 11.11 Measurement examples
  21. Chapter 12: System integration models and concepts
    1. 12.1 Purpose of integration and interfacing
    2. 12.2 The gap between ERP and PMC
    3. 12.3 ERP–MES integration
    4. 12.4 MES within an enterprise – data flow diagram
    5. 12.5 Integration architectures evolution
    6. 12.6 Eight systems architecture alternatives
    7. 12.7 Integration data identification
    8. 12.8 Common communication protocol
  22. Chapter 13: Product and vendor evaluation methodology
    1. 13.1 Software vendor functional scope
    2. 13.2 Software selection trends
    3. 13.3 Product landscape
    4. 13.4 Solution design assumptions
    5. 13.5 Proposed approach
    6. 13.6 Design revisit
    7. 13.7 System functionality and architecture design
    8. 13.8 Evaluation and selection teams
    9. 13.9 Visits to reference sites (if required)
    10. 13.10 Vendor survey form example
  23. Chapter 14: Software project management
    1. 14.1 Development life cycle
    2. 14.2 Risk minimization
    3. 14.3 Solution design requirements
    4. 14.4 Software development life cycle
    5. 14.5 Life cycle components
    6. 14.6 Critical chain project management
  24. Chapter 15: Change management
    1. 15.1 Organizational readiness
    2. 15.2 Reason for change
    3. 15.3 Strategies for change
    4. 15.4 Requirements for effective change
    5. 15.5 Change during system implementation
    6. 15.6 The three phases of change adoption
  25. Chapter 16: Conclusion
    1. 16.1 Manufacturing future
    2. 16.2 Establishing leadership
    3. 16.3 Success dependencies
    4. 16.4 Synchronization vision
  26. Appendix A: Practical exercises
  27. Appendix B: Model answers
  28. Glossary of terms
  29. Bibliography
  30. Index