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Practical Linux by Bill Ball, John Ray, Michael Turner, M. Drew Streib

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Setting Up New File Systems

When the kernel boots, it attempts to mount a root file system from the device specified by the kernel loader, LILO. The root file system is initially mounted read-only. During the boot process, the file systems listed in the file system table /etc/fstab are mounted. This file specifies which devices are to be mounted, what kinds of file systems they contain, at what point in the file system the mount takes place, and any options governing how they are to be mounted. The format of this file is described in fstab.

Importance of the /etc/fstab table

Always make a backup copy of the file system table, /etc/fstab, before making changes to your system, such as adding additional hard drives, or editing the table. If you ...

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