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Pro Tools All-in-One For Dummies, 3rd Edition by Jeff Strong

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Chapter 7: Making Your Mix

In This Chapter

check.png Submixing your tracks

check.png Mixing within Pro Tools

check.png Mixing to an external recorder

The final step in mixing your music involves taking all your EQed, panned, processed, and automated tracks and recording them into a stereo pair of tracks. This is often called bouncing your mix. In the old analog days, bouncing meant sending all your tracks to two separate tracks on the same tape deck or to a different tape deck. Nowadays, with Pro Tools, you can create bounces several ways — all of which I cover in this chapter.

In this chapter, I lead you through making your mix either within Pro Tools (in-the-box) or by sending your tracks to a digital or an analog two-track machine — usually a Digital Audio Tape (DAT) or (yes, even today) a reel-to-reel tape deck.

tip.eps Unless you have a seriously great analog deck and you want to add some of that sought-after “warmth-of-analog” tape sound to your final mix, your best bet is to go with the in-the-box approach — using the Pro Tools Bounce to Disk feature and keeping your music in your computer.

Submixing by Recording ...

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