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Python in a Nutshell, 2nd Edition by Alex Martelli

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Installing Python from Source Code

To install CPython from source code, you need a platform with an ISO-compliant C compiler and ancillary tools such as make. On Windows, the normal way to build Python is with Microsoft Visual Studio (version 7.1, a.k.a. VS2003, for Python 2.4 and 2.5).

To download Python source code, visit http://www.python.org and follow the link labeled Download. The latest version at the time of this writing is:

The .tgz file extension is equivalent to .tar.gz (i.e., a tar archive of files, compressed by the powerful and popular gzip compressor). You can also get a version with an extension of .tar.bz2 instead of .tgz, compressed with the even more powerful bzip2 compressor, if you’re able to deal with Bzip-2 compression (most popular utilities can nowadays).

To download sources for Python 2.5, see http://www.python.org/download/releases/2.5/. At the same URL, you will also find Python 2.5 documentation and binary releases. At the time of this writing, the first alpha release of 2.5 had just appeared, but by the time you read this book the final release of 2.5 is likely to be available.

Windows

On Windows, installing Python from source code can be a chore unless you are already familiar with Microsoft Visual Studio and also used to working at the Windows command line (i.e., in the text-oriented windows known as MS-DOS Prompt or Command Prompt, depending on your version of Windows).

If the following instructions ...

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