How it works...

In Step 1, we begin by reading in the arabidopsis.gff file, a file that describes the lengths of the chromosomes we'd like to use in our plot. We only needed the name, start, and end columns, so we piped the data to the dplyr::select() function to keep the appropriate columns, that is, X1, X4, and X5. As a .gff file has no column headings, the read_tsv() functions give the column names X1 ... Xn. We saved the result in the df object.

In Step 2, we started building the plot. We used the circos.genomicInitialize() function with df to create the plot's backbone and coordinate system and then manually added a single link. The circos.link() function allows us to create a single origin and destination using the chromosome's name, ...

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