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Research Methods in Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Edition

Book Description

Research Methods in Human-Computer Interaction is a comprehensive guide to performing research and is essential reading for both quantitative and qualitative methods. Since the first edition was published in 2009, the book has been adopted for use at leading universities around the world, including Harvard University, Carnegie-Mellon University, the University of Washington, the University of Toronto, HiOA (Norway), KTH (Sweden), Tel Aviv University (Israel), and many others. Chapters cover a broad range of topics relevant to the collection and analysis of HCI data, going beyond experimental design and surveys, to cover ethnography, diaries, physiological measurements, case studies, crowdsourcing, and other essential elements in the well-informed HCI researcher's toolkit. Continual technological evolution has led to an explosion of new techniques and a need for this updated 2nd edition, to reflect the most recent research in the field and newer trends in research methodology.

This Research Methods in HCI revision contains updates throughout, including more detail on statistical tests, coding qualitative data, and data collection via mobile devices and sensors. Other new material covers performing research with children, older adults, and people with cognitive impairments.

  • Comprehensive and updated guide to the latest research methodologies and approaches, and now available in EPUB3 format (choose any of the ePub or Mobi formats after purchase of the eBook)
  • Expanded discussions of online datasets, crowdsourcing, statistical tests, coding qualitative data, laws and regulations relating to the use of human participants, and data collection via mobile devices and sensors
  • New material on performing research with children, older adults, and people with cognitive impairments, two new case studies from Google and Yahoo!, and techniques for expanding the influence of your research to reach non-researcher audiences, including software developers and policymakers

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. Critical Acclaim for Research Methods in Human Computer Interaction, Second Edition
  6. About the Authors
  7. Foreword
  8. Preface
  9. Acknowledgments
  10. Chapter 1. Introduction to HCI research
    1. Abstract
    2. 1.1 Introduction
    3. 1.2 Types of HCI Research Contributions
    4. 1.3 Changes in Topics of HCI Research Over Time
    5. 1.4 Changes in HCI Research Methods Over Time
    6. 1.5 Understanding HCI Research Methods and Measurement
    7. 1.6 The Nature of Interdisciplinary Research in HCI
    8. 1.7 Who is the Audience for Your Research?
    9. 1.8 Understanding One Research Project in the Context of Related Research
    10. 1.9 Inherent Trade-Offs in HCI
    11. 1.10 Summary of Chapters
    12. Discussion Questions
    13. Research Design Exercise
    14. References
  11. Chapter 2. Experimental research
    1. Abstract
    2. 2.1 Types of Behavioral Research
    3. 2.2 Research Hypotheses
    4. 2.3 Basics of Experimental Research
    5. 2.4 Significance Tests
    6. 2.5 Limitations of Experimental Research
    7. 2.6 Summary
    8. Discussion Questions
    9. Research Design Exercises
    10. References
  12. Chapter 3. Experimental design
    1. Abstract
    2. 3.1 What Needs to be Considered When Designing Experiments?
    3. 3.2 Determining the Basic Design Structure
    4. 3.3 Investigating a Single Independent Variable
    5. 3.4 Investigating More Than One Independent Variable
    6. 3.5 Reliability of Experimental Results
    7. 3.6 Experimental Procedures
    8. 3.7 Summary
    9. Discussion Questions
    10. Research Design Exercises
    11. References
  13. Chapter 4. Statistical analysis
    1. Abstract
    2. 4.1 Preparing Data for Statistical Analysis
    3. 4.2 Descriptive Statistics
    4. 4.3 Comparing Means
    5. 4.4 t Tests
    6. 4.5 Analysis of Variance
    7. 4.6 Assumptions of t Tests and F Tests
    8. 4.7 Identifying Relationships
    9. 4.8 Nonparametric Statistical Tests
    10. 4.9 Summary
    11. Discussion Questions
    12. Research Design Exercises
    13. Team Exercises
    14. References
  14. Chapter 5. Surveys
    1. Abstract
    2. 5.1 Introduction
    3. 5.2 Benefits and Drawbacks of Surveys
    4. 5.3 Goals and Targeted Users for Survey Research
    5. 5.4 Probabilistic Sampling
    6. 5.5 Nonprobabilistic Sampling
    7. 5.6 Developing Survey Questions
    8. 5.7 Overall Survey Structure
    9. 5.8 Existing Surveys
    10. 5.9 Paper or Online Surveys?
    11. 5.10 Pilot Testing the Survey Tool
    12. 5.11 Response Rate
    13. 5.12 Data Analysis
    14. 5.13 Summary
    15. Discussion Questions
    16. Research Design Exercise
    17. References
  15. Chapter 6. Diaries
    1. Abstract
    2. 6.1 Introduction
    3. 6.2 Why Do We Use Diaries in HCI Research?
    4. 6.3 Participants for a Diary Study
    5. 6.4 What Type of Diary?
    6. 6.5 Data Collection for the Diary Study
    7. 6.6 Letting Participants Know When to Record a Diary Entry
    8. 6.7 Analysis of Diaries
    9. 6.8 Summary
    10. Discussion Questions
    11. Research Design Exercise
    12. References
  16. Chapter 7. Case studies
    1. Abstract
    2. 7.1 Introduction
    3. 7.2 Observing Sara: A Case Study of a Case Study
    4. 7.3 What is a Case Study?
    5. 7.4 Goals of HCI Case Studies
    6. 7.5 Types of Case Study
    7. 7.6 Research Questions and Hypotheses
    8. 7.7 Choosing Cases
    9. 7.8 Data Collection
    10. 7.9 Analysis and Interpretation
    11. 7.10 Writing Up the Study
    12. 7.11 Informal Case Studies
    13. 7.12 Summary
    14. Discussion Questions
    15. Research Design Exercises
    16. References
  17. Chapter 8. Interviews and focus groups
    1. Abstract
    2. 8.1 Introduction
    3. 8.2 Pros and Cons of Interviews
    4. 8.3 Applications of Interviews in HCI Research
    5. 8.4 Who to Interview
    6. 8.5 Interview Strategies
    7. 8.6 Interviews vs Focus Groups
    8. 8.7 Types of Questions
    9. 8.8 Conducting an Interview
    10. 8.9 Electronically Mediated Interviews and Focus Groups
    11. 8.10 Analyzing Interview Data
    12. 8.11 Summary
    13. Discussion Questions
    14. Research Design Exercises
    15. References
  18. Chapter 9. Ethnography
    1. Abstract
    2. 9.1 Introduction
    3. 9.2 What is Ethnography?
    4. 9.3 Ethnography in HCI
    5. 9.4 Conducting Ethnographic Research
    6. 9.5 Some Examples
    7. 9.6 Summary
    8. Discussion Questions
    9. Research Design Exercises
    10. References
  19. Chapter 10. Usability testing
    1. Abstract
    2. 10.1 Introduction
    3. 10.2 What is Usability Testing?
    4. 10.3 How Does Usability Testing Relate to “Traditional” Research?
    5. 10.4 Types of Usability Testing or Usability Inspections
    6. 10.5 The Process of User-Based Testing
    7. 10.6 Other Variations on Usability Testing
    8. 10.7 Summary
    9. Discussion Questions
    10. Research Design Exercise
    11. References
  20. Chapter 11. Analyzing qualitative data
    1. Abstract
    2. 11.1 Introduction
    3. 11.2 Goals and Stages of Qualitative Analysis
    4. 11.3 Content Analysis
    5. 11.4 Analyzing Text Content
    6. 11.5 Analyzing Multimedia Content
    7. 11.6 Summary
    8. Discussion Questions
    9. Research Design Exercise
    10. References
  21. Chapter 12. Automated data collection methods
    1. Abstract
    2. 12.1 Introduction
    3. 12.2 Existing Tools
    4. 12.3 Activity-Logging Software
    5. 12.4 Custom Software
    6. 12.5 Hybrid Data Collection Methods
    7. 12.6 Data Management and Analysis
    8. 12.7 Automated Interface Evaluation
    9. 12.8 Challenges of Computerized Data Collection
    10. 12.9 Summary
    11. Discussion Questions
    12. Research Design Exercises
    13. References
  22. Chapter 13. Measuring the human
    1. Abstract
    2. 13.1 Introduction
    3. 13.2 Eye Tracking
    4. 13.3 Motion and Position Tracking
    5. 13.4 Physiological Tools
    6. 13.5 Data Collection, Analysis, and Interpretation
    7. 13.6 Examples
    8. 13.7 Summary
    9. Discussion Questions
    10. Research Design Exercise
    11. References
  23. Chapter 14. Online and ubiquitous HCI research
    1. Abstract
    2. 14.1 Introduction
    3. 14.2 Online Research
    4. 14.3 Human Computation
    5. 14.4 Sensors and Ubiquitous Computing
    6. 14.5 Summary
    7. Discussion Questions
    8. Research Design Exercise
    9. References
  24. Chapter 15. Working with human subjects
    1. Abstract
    2. 15.1 Introduction
    3. 15.2 Identifying Potential Participants
    4. 15.3 Care and Handling of Research Participants
    5. 15.4 Human Subjects Research and the Public Trust
    6. 15.5 Summary
    7. Discussion Questions
    8. Research Design Exercises
    9. References
  25. Chapter 16. Working with research participants with disabilities
    1. Abstract
    2. 16.1 Introduction
    3. 16.2 Participants
    4. 16.3 Methodological Considerations
    5. 16.4 Logistics
    6. 16.5 Summary
    7. Research Design Exercise
    8. Discussion Questions
    9. References
  26. Index