205
20
20
20
5
5
5
Printing &
Transfers
You can use a variety of simple
printing techniques to create
images with distinctive textures
and character. If you’ve never
made a print before, you’ll fi nd that
hand-pulling a print from a block
you carved yourself is an extremely
satisfying process.
You can create individual prints to
digitize for use in projects, or print
a commercial job on which you
personally add a stamped or hand-
pulled image.
In this section we also show you
several methods of transferring
images to various substrates. These
techniques are not only handy for
creating comps to show clients, but
they add to your repertoire of skills,
expanding your design options.
PART 6
20620
6
42 Roller Printing
Create quick and easy
repetitive patterns with
cheap foam rollers.
See pages 208209.
43 Stamp Printing
Don’t neglect the simple
art of stamping to make
prints. With clever use of
overlapping stamps and
cropping, they can be an
inexpensive and handy
way to add a personal
touch to your design work.
See pages 210213.
Printing & Transfers
A variety of our favorite hands-on activities
With Wood Blocks
Wood carving creates a traditionally
rough and rugged look because
you’re carving across the grain.
(Don’t confuse wood block carving
with wood engraving, which uses
the end grain, di erent tools, and
creates amazingly fi ne lines and
details! But it’s not in this book.)
See pages 222223.
With Found Objects
Make prints from things around
your house or studio—leaves,
cardboard shapes, old tile, sponges,
bricks, anything you can ink up and
put paper on top of.
See pages 224–225.
With Rubber Blocks
A rubber block is the easiest
thing to carve intoeasier
than butter.
See pages 216–219.
With Linoleum Blocks
A linoleum block is denser than
a rubber block so you can get
ner detail. It’s tougher to carve
into, but you can do more with
it and the block itself will last
through more printings.
See pages 220221.
44 Printmaking
Carving into a substrate with a knife creates rich, organic
forms that can be used in a variety of ways. In this chapter
we’ll show you a number of possible printing techniques.
See pages 214–215.
A
variet
y
of our f
av
v
v
oror
itit
it
e e
e
haha
ha
nd
nd
s-s-
on
o
activities
207
45 Transfers
Transferring images to various substrates is
extremely useful for creating comps for clients,
as well as adding to your creative pool of ideas.
See pages 226–231.
Transfer to Polymer Backing
Transfer an image to a sheet of polymer
or matte medium.
See page 227.
Transfer Directly to Substrate
Transfer an image directly to your project,
such as a collage or product.
See pages 228229.
Transfer with Lazertran
Use Lazertran paper to transfer images
to just about anything.
See page 230.
Transfer with Packing Tape
Use this amazingly simple technique
to place a transparent image anywhere.
See page 231.
20
20
20
20
2
20
2
2
2
2
2
20
20
0
2020
20
0
0
0
0
0
0
20
2
2
0
0
0
20
0
0
0
20
2
20
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
0
2
2
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
2
2
0
0
2
2
0
0
2
2
0
2
0
0
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
207
 & 

Get Robin Williams Handmade Design Workshop: Create Handmade Elements for Digital Design now with the O’Reilly learning platform.

O’Reilly members experience books, live events, courses curated by job role, and more from O’Reilly and nearly 200 top publishers.