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Sams Teach Yourself Internet and Web Basics All in One by T. Michael Clark, Bob Temple, Ned Snell

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Anatomy of a Web Page

Most Web pages contain, in addition to other optional parts, many of the elements described in this section. You should know what these parts are because the principal task in Web authoring is deciding what content to use for each standard part; a principal challenge is dealing with the different ways each browser treats the different parts. (More on that later in this chapter.)

Parts You See

The following Web page elements are typically visible to visitors through a browser (see Figure 17.1):

  • A title, which graphical browsers (most Windows, Macintosh, and X Windows browsers) typically display in the title bar of the window in which the page appears.

    The real title of a Web page does not appear within the page itself, but ...

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