O'Reilly logo

Secure XML: The New Syntax for Signatures and Encryption by Kitty Niles, Donald E. Eastlake

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

6.1. Introduction to XPath

An XPath expression specifies a part of any XML object to which it is applied.

XPath models XML as a hierarchical tree of nodes. The best way of thinking of this structure is to say the following: An XPath operation takes an XPath node-set (or XML converted into an XPath node-set) and then tags certain nodes in that set as being selected. As long as you stay in the world of XPath node-sets, the entire original node-set remains accessible through XPath operations that can find related nodes from any starting node in the set. For example, XPath operations can find ancestor or descendant nodes. As soon as you leave the XPath world with a selected node-set, all nodes not output are lost. In XML Security, the nodes output ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required