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Semantic Web for the Working Ontologist

Book Description

The promise of the Semantic Web to provide a universal medium to exchange data information and knowledge has been well publicized. There are many sources too for basic information on the extensions to the WWW that permit content to be expressed in natural language yet used by software agents to easily find, share and integrate information. Until now individuals engaged in creating ontologies-- formal descriptions of the concepts, terms, and relationships within a given knowledge domain-- have had no sources beyond the technical standards documents.

Semantic Web for the Working Ontologist transforms this information into the practical knowledge that programmers and subject domain experts need. Authors Allemang and Hendler begin with solutions to the basic problems, but don’t stop there: they demonstrate how to develop your own solutions to problems of increasing complexity and ensure that your skills will keep pace with the continued evolution of the Semantic Web.

• Provides practical information for all programmers and subject matter experts engaged in modeling data to fit the requirements of the Semantic Web.
• De-emphasizes algorithms and proofs, focusing instead on real-world problems, creative solutions, and highly illustrative examples.
• Presents detailed, ready-to-apply “recipes” for use in many specific situations.
• Shows how to create new recipes from RDF, RDFS, and OWL constructs.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. Preface
  6. About the Authors
  7. Chapter 1. What Is the Semantic Web?
    1. WHAT IS A WEB?
    2. SMART WEB, DUMB WEB
    3. SEMANTIC DATA
    4. SUMMARY
  8. Chapter 2. Semantic Modeling
    1. MODELING FOR HUMAN COMMUNICATION
    2. EXPLANATION AND PREDICTION
    3. SUMMARY
  9. Chapter 3. RDF—The Basis of the Semantic Web
    1. DISTRIBUTING DATA ACROSS THE WEB
    2. MERGING DATA FROM MULTIPLE SOURCES
    3. NAMESPACES, URIs, AND IDENTITY
    4. IDENTIFIERS IN THE RDF NAMESPACE
    5. CHALLENGE: RDF AND TABULAR DATA
    6. HIGHER-ORDER RELATIONSHIPS
    7. ALTERNATIVES FOR SERIALIZATION
    8. BLANK NODES
    9. SUMMARY
  10. Chapter 4. Semantic Web Application Architecture
    1. RDF PARSER/SERIALIZER
    2. RDF STORE
    3. APPLICATION CODE
    4. DATA FEDERATION
    5. SUMMARY
  11. Chapter 5. RDF and Inferencing
    1. INFERENCE IN THE SEMANTIC WEB
    2. WHERE ARE THE SMARTS?
    3. SUMMARY
  12. Chapter 6. RDF Schema
    1. SCHEMA LANGUAGES AND THEIR FUNCTIONS
    2. WHAT DOES IT MEAN? SEMANTICS AS INFERENCE
    3. THE RDF SCHEMA LANGUAGE
    4. RDFS MODELING COMBINATIONS AND PATTERNS
    5. CHALLENGES
    6. MODELING WITH DOMAINS AND RANGES
    7. NONMODELING PROPERTIES IN RDFS
    8. SUMMARY
  13. Chapter 7. RDFS-Plus
    1. INVERSE
    2. SYMMETRIC PROPERTIES
    3. TRANSITIVITY
    4. EQUIVALENCE
    5. COMPUTING SAMENESS—FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES
    6. A FEW MORE CONSTRUCTS
    7. SUMMARY
  14. Chapter 8. Using RDFS-Plus in the Wild
    1. SKOS
    2. FOAF
    3. SUMMARY
  15. Chapter 9. Basic OWL
    1. RESTRICTIONS
    2. CHALLENGE PROBLEMS
    3. RELATIONSHIP TRANSFER IN FOAF
    4. ALTERNATIVE DESCRIPTIONS OF RESTRICTIONS
    5. SUMMARY
  16. Chapter 10. Counting and Set in OWL
    1. UNIONS AND INTERSECTIONS
    2. DIFFERENTIATING MULTIPLE INDIVIDUALS
    3. CARDINALITY
    4. SET COMPLEMENT
    5. DISJOINT SETS
    6. PREREQUISITES REVISITED
    7. CONTRADICTIONS
    8. UNSATISFIABLE CLASSES
    9. INFERRING CLASS RELATIONSHIPS
    10. REASONING WITH INDIVIDUALS AND WITH CLASSES
    11. SUMMARY
  17. Chapter 11. Using OWL in the Wild
    1. THE FEDERAL ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE REFERENCE MODEL ONTOLOGY
    2. REFERENCE MODELS AND COMPOSABILITY
    3. RESOLVING AMBIGUITY IN THE MODEL: SETS VERSUS INDIVIDUALS
    4. CONSTRAINTS BETWEEN MODELS
    5. OWL AND COMPOSITION
    6. ADVANTAGES OF THE MODELING APPROACH
    7. THE NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE ONTOLOGY
    8. REQUIREMENTS OF THE NCI ONTOLOGY
    9. UPPER-LEVEL CLASSES
    10. DESCRIBING CLASSES IN THE NCI ONTOLOGY
    11. INSTANCE-LEVEL INFERENCING IN THE NCI ONTOLOGY
    12. SUMMARY
  18. Chapter 12. Good and Bad Modeling Practices
    1. GETTING STARTED
    2. MODELING FOR REUSE
    3. COMMON MODELING ERRORS
    4. SUMMARY
  19. Chapter 13. OWL Levels and Logic
    1. OWL DIALECTS AND MODELING PHILOSOPHY
    2. OWL FULL VERSUS OWL DL
    3. OWL LITE
    4. OTHER SUBSETS OF OWL
    5. BEYOND OWL 1.0
    6. SUMMARY
  20. Chapter 14. Conclusions
  21. Frequently Asked Question
  22. Further Reading
  23. Index
  24. Instructions for online access