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SolidWorks® Administration Bible by Matt Lombard

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Chapter 20. Rolling out New Versions

Rolling out a new version of SolidWorks to a set of users can be a challenging prospect, depending on factors such as the new functionality in the release and how your company uses the software. Some releases of SolidWorks can be very disruptive to a company's workflow, and some may be relatively painless for users to adopt. For example, the jump from SolidWorks 2007 to 2008 was, and continues to be, difficult for companies to cope with. The interface changed drastically in several areas, and some important features were added at the same time. The jump from SolidWorks 2008 and 2009 was less drastic, however, but finished several interface changes that had begun in 2008 but that were not completed until 2009. The jump from 2009 to 2010 promises to be relatively easy again, with small changes to a wide range of the software, but nothing too drastic in the interface.

When interface changes are forced on users, the change is more likely to be disruptive. When discussing CAD technology, you can find many people who are simply proponents of change without much regard for what the content of the change is. They just like to see things that are new and different. When you are charged with running a CAD department for a company that is in business to make money in order to keep employees' paychecks coming, sometimes your priorities must be somewhat different. It is not a question ...

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