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Special Edition Using Microsoft® Office XP by Woody Leonhard, Ed Bott

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Combining Two or More Data Types in One Document

After you get beyond the simple letter-writing or number-calculating aspects of Office, compound documents—such as a Word document with an integrated Excel worksheet or a PowerPoint presentation with an Excel chart—become more and more essential to effective business use of Office XP.

The most common example, of course, is a corporate report, in which financial data from Excel (or tabular material from Access) is blended into a Word document, as shown in Figure 6.7. Or you might use Word to generate explanatory text for an Excel worksheet. You can store résumés from job candidates as Word documents in a field in an Access database. PowerPoint presentations almost routinely are compound documents ...

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