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Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005: Learn Visual Basic 2005 as You Design and Develop a Complete Application by Tim Patrick

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Chapter 8. Classes and Inheritance

How many .NET programmers does it take to change a light bulb? None—they call a method on the light bulb object, and it changes itself. Ha, ha, ha! That’s funny, but only if you understand the object-oriented programming (OOP) concepts that are the basic foundation of the .NET system. (Actually, it’s not even that funny if you do understand OOP.) Without OOP, it would be difficult to support core features of .NET, such as the central System.Object object, which is the basic foundation of the .NET system. Also, productivity would go way down among Windows developers, who are the basic foundation of the .NET system.

Although I briefly mentioned OOP development concepts in both Chapters 1, “Introducing .NET,” and ...

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