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Ten Minute Guide to Access 97 by Faithe Wempen

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Why Create Relationships?

Lesson 2 encouraged you to make separate tables for information that was not directly related. As you've learned along the way, when you create forms, queries, and reports, you can pull information from more than one table easily. But this works best when there is a well-defined relationship between the tables.

Let's say, for instance, that I had two tables containing information about my customers. One table, Customers, contained their names and addresses, and the other, Orders, contained their orders. The two tables would have a common field: Customer ID#. All records in the Orders table would correspond to a record in the Customers table. (This is called a "many-to-one" relationship because there could be many orders ...

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