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The Complete Graphic Designer by Ryan Hembree

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Page Layout & Design
71
Page Elements
Typography
Graphic designers should embody a love and passion
for typography—not only for the way in which letters,
words, and sentences are arranged on the page, but
also for the design and emotional qualities of the let-
terforms themselves. Good typography is a true sign
of a talented designer, so it is important to make sure
typeface choices are appropriate and their implemen-
tation is fl awless.
Typefaces have unique characteristics and expressive
qualities that allow the designer to identify and prop-
erly specify a font for use in a page layout. Composed
of many different parts, the anatomy of a typeface is
rather complex. The attentive designer places a priority
on selecting the right typeface for the visual solution,
one that will help communicate the intended message.
Some considerations for the selection of a font include
the physical form a printed piece will take and the
type of paper it will be printed on. For example, in
book design, Garamond or Caslon may be used for
their well-proportioned letter widths and clean serifs,
which make reading easier. Newspapers use Times
New Roman or similar serif typefaces with large x-
heights and open counter forms so that when printed
on coarse newsprint, the ink spread (“dot gain”)
doesn’t fi ll in the negative space of certain letters.
By choosing typefaces that are similar to or coordinate
with those used in existing client collateral, the designer
can help establish a more cohesive, consistent brand
image. To fi nd suitable matches, study the subtle nuances
of certain letters of the typeface. For example, the letters
“y, “Q, “g, and the ampersand all yield valuable clues to
specifying an appropriate or nearly identical typeface.
In some instances, typog-
raphy is used as an illustra-
tion, as in these layouts.
Letterforms overlap to form
surprising new shapes and
unique color combinations.
Design: Shinnoske, Inc.
TB
Provision-Complete Graphic Designer
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