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The Interior Design Reference & Specification Book by Mimi Love, Chris Grimley, Linda O'Shea

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Job:02-30056 Title: RP-Interior Design Reference and Specification
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THE INTERIOR DESIGN REFERENCE + SPECIFICATION BOOK
Text
Chapter 1: Starting an Interior Project
The thought of starting an interior project can be daunting; however, with a bit
of strategic planning, a project can be launched smoothly and effectively. What-
ever the scale of the project, four basic elements must be considered from the
beginning: project site, program, schedule, and budget. These four items are
seldom determined exclusively by the client or the designer, but usually by both
in collaboration. The fewer the variables, the more efcient the process will be.
PROJECT SITE
In general, a client engages a designer once a site or space is in hand. It is then the designer’s
task to analyze the space to ensure that it will meet the client’s needs. Sometimes, a client may
not have a single space in mind, but rather a few options that the designer will test to ascertain
which one best suits the client’s needs. Both of these scenarios suggest that the client is work-
ing toward a particular program; however, sometimes the physical space generates the program.
In this case, the designer’s task is to decide the best layout for the space and design a program
within those constraints.
PROGRAMMING
Programming is the process of defining the needs of those who will use the space, in advance
of creating the design. Whether for a home kitchen renovation or for a newly constructed
restaurant, this exercise should evaluate the functional performance, opportunities, and
constraints of the existing space. Furthermore, the program should articulate what spaces,
features, or attributes must be added to improve functionality and give an appropriate and
compelling character to a space. The programmatic goals should be precisely qualied in a
brief, the written document that outlines all functional, dimensional, and relational require-
ments. This list of objectives will form the basis for evaluating design solutions in subsequent
phases of the project.
Programming can be broken down into three central types of activities:
and
goals and the format of the program wish list can vary widely. For small projects, gathering
data and analyzing the client’s needs are essential; providing a written report is less so. That
said, to avoid miscommunication, some record of the process must be made. Thus, program-
ming might consist of a lled-in questionnaire, a detailed interview, or a inventory that denes
the microdeterministic issues, such as the number and type of shoes within a closet or the
amount of cupboard space needed to accommodate everyday dishes and ne china. For large
corporate and institutional projects, the designer will need to listen to and put in order criteria
from a broad range of stakeholders. Often the interior designer must synthesize conicting
information and make recommendations to the client that can have policy implications beyond
physical planning. Documentation is essential. In all cases, the designer is required to priori-
tize wish lists to make meaningful and nite design decisions.
Although this step might at times seem extraneous,
cess because it is here that the client’s problems and goals are clearly identified
nication is key to articulating the program and managing expectations for the design phase. A
lack of understanding the goals at this stage may result in cost overruns during the construc-
tion phase or, even more detrimental, a project that does not meet the client’s basic needs.
Ideally, the program serves as a core map from which design objectives, spatial adjacencies,
and building constraints are elaborated.
SITE PROGRAMMING SCHEDULE BUDGET
PROGRAMMING ACTIVITIES
Gathering Information Analyzing Information Documenting Information
•Collectfloorplans.
•Visits itew ithclient.
•Reportfieldobservations.
•Determin eclientstructure
•C ompileinformationon
•Interviewclientreprese nta
Job:02-30056 Title: RP-Interior Design Reference and Specification
#175 Dtp:216 Page:10
(RAY)
001-017_30056.indd 10 3/4/13 7:19 PM

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