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The Interior Design Reference & Specification Book by Mimi Love, Chris Grimley, Linda O'Shea

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8 4
THE INTERIOR DESIGN REFERENCE + SPECIFICATION BOOK
Chapter 6: Sequencing Spaces
Although the art of composing a plan would seem to be the province of the archi-
tect, the interior designer must be involved in choreographing the sequence of
spaces, so that a project reects a single design approach. Acknowledging the nec-
essary collaboration between architects and interior designers, it is important to
understand the two primary vehicles for organizing the relationship between rooms:
the plan and the cross section.
Through-Room and Independent Circulation
Interior design typically begins with the plan. Fundamental to the logic of the plan is the
distinction between rooms that can serve as both places and as routes for through-
circulationsuch as the living room, dining room, and kitchenand rooms that, because
of issues of privacy, require a separate circulation space or network of spaces to access
themsuch as bedrooms and bathrooms.
Servant Spaces
A third type of space comprises closets, storage rooms, pantries, replaces, and powder
rooms. Spaces of this category should be consolidated into systemic
create acoustical privacy between larger rooms and to generate a logic for the plumbing, ven-
tilation, and mechanical systems and overall structure of the house. When composing a plan,
it is useful to consider these consolidated smaller spaces as solid masses, in opposition to
the open spaces of major rooms. In the late 1950s, American architect Louis Kahn qualied
this as an opposition between “servant” and “served” spaces. In the 1980s, the consolidated
zones of servant spaces came to be called the
technique used in the nineteenth century at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris (from the French
pocher
Relationships between Rooms
Networks of rooms can be conceived by aggregating rooms, with the gap between each
room functioning as both a thick-wall poche zone and a threshold space. Rooms can also be
created by subdividing a space with thick-wall zones or chunks of poche, as the Farnsworth
House illustrates below.
The plan of the Robie House is
composed of two distinct wings
that separate the public from
the private space.
The plan of the Farnsworth House
is a modern example of poche; the
kitchen, bathroom, and storage
areas are collected into one single
volume in the open plan.
section
plan
COMPOSING A HOUSE IN PLAN
Job:02-30056 Title: RP-Interior Design Reference and Specification
#175 Dtp:216 Page:84
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Job:02-30056 Title: RP-Interior Design Reference and Specification
#175 Dtp:216 Page:85
(RAY)
Job:02-30056 Title: RP-Interior Design Reference and Specification
#175 Dtp:216 Page:84
084-091_30056.indd 85 3/4/13 7:32 PM
Text
85
spaces, so that a project reects a single design approach. Acknowledging the nec
-
understand the two primary vehicles for organizing the relationship between rooms:
Servant Spaces
A third type of space comprises closets, storage rooms, pantries, replaces, and powder
rooms. Spaces of this category should be consolidated into systemic thick-wall” zones to
create acoustical privacy between larger rooms and to generate a logic for the plumbing, ven-
tilation, and mechanical systems and overall structure of the house. When composing a plan,
it is useful to consider these consolidated smaller spaces as solid masses, in opposition to
the open spaces of major rooms. In the late 1950s, American architect Louis Kahn qualied
this as an opposition between “servant” and “served” spaces. In the 1980s, the consolidated
zones of servant spaces came to be called the poche,” a term borrowed from a drawing
technique used in the nineteenth century at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris (from the French
pocher “to ll in”).
Frank Lloyd Wright, Robie House
Mies van der Rohe, Farnsworth House
Relationships between Rooms
Networks of rooms can be conceived by aggregating rooms, with the gap between each
room functioning as both a thick-wall poche zone and a threshold space. Rooms can also be
created by subdividing a space with thick-wall zones or chunks of poche, as the Farnsworth
House illustrates below.
The plan of the Robie House is
composed of two distinct wings
that separate the public from
the private space.
The plan of the Farnsworth House
is a modern example of poche; the
kitchen, bathroom, and storage
areas are collected into one single
volume in the open plan.
Job:02-30056 Title: RP-Interior Design Reference and Specification
#175 Dtp:216 Page:85
(RAY)
Job:02-30056 Title: RP-Interior Design Reference and Specification
#175 Dtp:216 Page:84
084-091_30056.indd 85 3/4/13 7:32 PM

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