There are
variouskinds
of atoms, and
a number is
aigned to
eachone.
This is caed
the atomic
number.
For example, the
atomic number
of coer, which
is often used in
electric lines, is 29.
Why is coer
number 29?
The atomic number is
thesame as the number
of protons that the
atom has.
And since
there are the
same number
of protons
as electrons,
coer must
also have
29electrons.
There are four orbits
caed electron shes
around the nucleus of
a coer atom. Starting
from the iermost she,
these contain 2, 8, 18, and 1
electron, respectively, for
a total of 29 electrons.
An electron in the
outermost she is caed a
valence electron.
Atomic Structure and Conductivity
Valence electron
Nucleus
So coer has only
one valence electron,
right?
A valence electron easily
becomes a fr electron
because the binding force of
the atom is the weakest in the
outermost electron she.
If external heat or light
is aed to a coer
atom, that energy is
concentrated on the one
valence electron.
Ah! Therefore, the
valence electron of
a coer atom easily
escapes, and electricity
easily flows, right?
That's right!
In fact, coer atoms
share their valence electrons
normay, and since these
valence electrons aren't
aociated with any single
atom but move frly betwn
atoms, electricity wi flow
easily. This property is what
defines metals, and gives
them their characteristic
large conductivity!
I get it!
Nucleus
Heat
Light
Atom
Atom
Atom
Atom
Pluck!
N
Atomic Structure and Conductivity 35

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