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The New Leader's 100-Day Action Plan by John A. Lawler, Jayme A. Check, George B. Bradt

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1Position Yourself for SuccessGet the Job. Make Sure It Is Right for You. Avoid Common Land Mines.

Figure depicting two broad horizontal arrows pointing rightward with “the new leader's 100-day action plan” mentioned on the upper arrow and “activate ongoing communication” on the lower arrow. In between the arrows from left to right is mentioned position yourself for success, leverage the fuzzy front end, take control of day one, co-create burning imperative, embed milestones, jump-start early wins, complete organization role start, and evolve, leadership, practices, and culture. An arrowhead is pointing at position yourself for success.

As discussed in the executive summary, the four main ideas in this book are: (1) Get a head start; (2) Manage the message; (3) Set direction. Build the team; (4) Sustain momentum. Deliver results.

As you start to position yourself for success, know that leadership is personal. Your message is the key that unlocks personal connections. The greater the congruence between your own preferences across behaviors, relationships, attitudes, values, and environment and the new culture you enter or create, the stronger those connections will be. This is why the best messages aren't crafted—they emerge. This is why great leaders live their messages not because they can, but because they must. “Here I stand, I can do no other.”1

Knowing your strengths and motivations will help you better create career options that are a true fit for your skills, will allow you to better position yourself in interviews (sell before you buy), and will help you do a thorough due diligence to mitigate risks.

“I wish I'd read this chapter before I accepted that job!”

We hear that a lot.

Culture First

In many respects, leadership is an exercise in building culture. However you define it, culture is the glue that holds organizations together. It may be the only truly sustainable competitive advantage for any organization. ...

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