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UML™ Bible by Tom Pender

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CHAPTER 17

Representing an Architecture in UML 2.0

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In This Chapter

  • Defining the Deployment diagram in UML 2.0
  • Defining and modeling nodes and associations
  • Defining and modeling components and realizations
  • Defining and modeling artifacts and manifestations
  • Defining and modeling deployments, deployment targets, deployment specifications, and deployed artifacts

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In UML 2.0, there is a significant change in the vocabulary for modeling runtime environments. UML 1.4 says that components may be used to specify both the requirements for a physical software element and the physical implementation of that element.

UML 2.0 instead opts for a parallel structure, using components and artifacts as represented in Figure 17-1. In this structure, the component is used solely to define the requirements for each physical software element, while an artifact defines the implementation properties for the component.

Each side of the parallel structure for components and artifacts follows the same pattern. A component is defined using a set of one or more classifiers. The same classifier may be used to build any number of components. The specialized dependency Realization maps the refinement of the logical specifications modeled by classifiers that are used to build the component's specification for ...

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