O'Reilly logo

Understanding the Linux Kernel, 3rd Edition by Marco Cesati, Daniel P. Bovet

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Linux Versions

Up to kernel version 2.5, Linux identified kernels through a simple numbering scheme. Each version was characterized by three numbers, separated by periods. The first two numbers were used to identify the version; the third number identified the release. The first version number, namely 2, has stayed unchanged since 1996. The second version number identified the type of kernel: if it was even, it denoted a stable version; otherwise, it denoted a development version.

As the name suggests, stable versions were thoroughly checked by Linux distributors and kernel hackers. A new stable version was released only to address bugs and to add new device drivers. Development versions, on the other hand, differed quite significantly from one another; kernel developers were free to experiment with different solutions that occasionally lead to drastic kernel changes. Users who relied on development versions for running applications could experience unpleasant surprises when upgrading their kernel to a newer release.

During development of Linux kernel version 2.6, however, a significant change in the version numbering scheme has taken place. Basically, the second number no longer identifies stable or development versions; thus, nowadays kernel developers introduce large and significant changes in the current kernel version 2.6. A new kernel 2.7 branch will be created only when kernel developers will have to test a really disruptive change; this 2.7 branch will lead to a new current kernel version, or it will be backported to the 2.6 version, or finally it will simply be dropped as a dead end.

The new model of Linux development implies that two kernels having the same version but different release numbers—for instance, 2.6.10 and 2.6.11—can differ significantly even in core components and in fundamental algorithms. Thus, when a new kernel release appears, it is potentially unstable and buggy. To address this problem, the kernel developers may release patched versions of any kernel, which are identified by a fourth number in the version numbering scheme. For instance, at the time this paragraph was written, the latest "stable" kernel version was 2.6.11.12.

Please be aware that the kernel version described in this book is Linux 2.6.11.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required