O'Reilly logo

Unicode Demystified by Richard Gillam

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Line Layout

Once you've decided which words will go together on a line, the next step is to determine the order in which the characters will be arranged on that line. For the majority of scripts, this task is straightforward: The characters march in succession, one by one, from the left-hand side to the right-hand side (or, in some languages, from the top of the page to the bottom). In a couple of situations, matters get more interesting:

  • The most common exception involves combining character sequences. Usually, a combining character sequence turns into a single glyph, but sometimes (especially when the text contains a lot of base–diacritic combinations) the rendering process has to draw two (or more) separate glyphs and figure out how to position ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required