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Use Cases: Requirements in Context, Second Edition by Eamonn Guiney, Daryl Kulak

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2. Moving to Use Cases

Storytelling reveals meaning without committing the error of defining it.

—HANNAH ARENDT

The computer industry has struggled to find a way to represent functionality to users. We have always tended to produce what we’re comfortable with: diagrams and specifications that are loaded with terminology and notation that looks a lot more like computer code than anything a user would understand. The traditional modes of expressing functionality to users early in the lifecycle are as follows:

• Requirements specifications

• Functional decompositions

• Data-flow diagrams (DFDs)

• Entity-relationship diagrams (ERDs)

• Prototypes

Typically, requirements are specified in lists and expressed in terms of “the system shall.” These lists ...

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