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Version Control with Subversion, 2nd Edition by Brian W. Fitzpatrick, Ben Collins-Sussman, C. Michael Pilato

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File Portability

Fortunately for Subversion users who routinely find themselves on different computers with different operating systems, Subversion’s command-line program behaves almost identically on all those systems. If you know how to wield svn on one platform, you know how to wield it everywhere.

However, the same is not always true of other general classes of software or of the actual files you keep in Subversion. For example, on a Windows machine, the definition of a text file would be similar to that used on a Linux box, but with a key difference: the character sequences used to mark the ends of the lines of those files. There are other differences, too. Unix platforms have (and Subversion supports) symbolic links; Windows does not. Unix platforms use filesystem permission to determine executability; Windows uses filename extensions.

Because Subversion is in no position to unite the whole world in common definitions and implementations of all of these things, the best it can do is to try to help make your life simpler when you need to work with your versioned files and directories on multiple computers and operating systems. This section describes some of the ways Subversion does this.

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