LESSONS LEARNED FOR REGIONAL AND GLOBAL ENERGY SECURITY

YAROSLAV MINULLIN

IIASA-DYN, Laxenburg, Austria

LEO SCHRATTENHOLZER

Visiting Professor of the Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, (deceased)

1 INTRODUCTION

One major thrust for the production of this volume on Science and Technology for Homeland Security was the “need for a coordinated scientific and technological response to terrorism” [1]. As a political response to terrorism, the Homeland Security Presidential Directive/HSPD-7 established a national policy for federal departments and agencies to identify and prioritize United States critical infrastructure and key resources and to protect them from terrorist attacks [2]. Voeller [1], (op. cit.) argues that the Presidential Directive does not emphasize the “need to mobilize the nation's skills in science and technology” as strongly as the operational concerns. This apparent lack of emphasis was the stimulus for the study by the National Research Council (NRC) Making the Nation Safer: The Role of Science and Technology in Countering Terrorism [3]. In response to the research priorities identified by the NRC report, the present volume was proposed to create a major new reference resource. Picking up one of the aims proposed for this handbook, this overview article addresses “the international dimensions of homeland security.”

1.1 Background

The background of the authors of this article is in the field of systems analysis. Together, they gathered some 40 years of work experience ...

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