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Windows 2000 Commands Pocket Reference by Æleen Frisch

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Entering Commands

  • Commands are not case-sensitive.

  • Command options are not usually case-sensitive. The few options that are lowercase only are specified as such in this book. Uppercase and mixed-case options can be assumed to be case-insensitive.

  • Command options are generally preceded by a forward slash—for example, /X. In many cases, a minus sign may be substituted for the slash if desired. A few commands (mostly originating in the Resource Kit) require that their options be preceded by a minus sign.

  • Option placement is not consistent across all commands. Consult the syntax summary for option placement for a specific command.

  • Distinct command arguments are separated by spaces, commas, or semicolons.

  • A command may be continued onto a second (or subsequent) line by placing a caret (^) as the final character of the initial line.

  • The caret is also used as the escape symbol, protecting the following character from being processed by the command interpreter.

  • Multiple commands may be concatenated by an ampersand: command1 & command2. The commands are executed in sequence.

  • Commands may be executed conditionally, based on the success or failure of a preceding command, by joining them with && or || (respectively):

    command1 && command2

    Execute command2 only if command1 succeeds.

    command1 || command2

    Execute command2 only if command1 fails.

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