O'Reilly logo

Windows 8.1: The Missing Manual by David Pogue

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Opening Desktop Programs

Windows lets you launch (open) programs in many different ways:

  • Choose a program’s name from the Start screen.

  • Choose a program’s name from the “All apps” list. (On the Start screen, right-click, or swipe up from the bottom of the screen, to reveal the App bar; select “All apps.”)

  • Click a program’s icon on the taskbar.

  • Double-click an application’s program-file icon in the Computer→Local Disk (C:)→Program Files→[application] folder, or highlight the application’s icon and then press Enter.

  • Press a key combination you’ve assigned to be the program’s shortcut.

  • Press +R, type the program file’s name in the Open text box, and then press Enter.

  • Let Windows launch the program for you, either at startup (Reliability Monitor) or at a time you’ve specified (see Task Scheduler, Task Scheduler).

  • Open a document using any of the above techniques; its “parent” program opens automatically. For example, if you used Microsoft Word to write a file called “Last Will and Testament.doc,” then double-clicking the document’s icon launches Word and automatically opens that file.

What happens next depends on the program you’re using (and whether or not you opened a document). Most programs present you with a new, blank, untitled document. Some, like FileMaker and Microsoft PowerPoint, welcome you instead with a question: Do you want to open an existing document or create a new one? And a ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required