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Windows® CE 3.0 Application Programming by Marshall Brain, Nick Grattan

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Unicode Text and Strings

Before starting out there are a couple of topics that need to be covered, and the first of these is Unicode. Windows 98 API functions have partial support for Unicode strings, and Windows 2000 and NT allow applications to call either Unicode or ANSI versions of the API functions. Windows CE, on the other hand, only supports Unicode, so you will need to write your applications using Unicode strings and text.

Most of us grew up safe in the knowledge that a character was stored in a single byte using eight bits. Character strings are stored in "char" arrays and are terminated with a NULL, ANSI 0 character. Strangely enough, the "char" data type is signed, but we get used to that. The problem is that there are many more than ...

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