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Windows Vista Security: Praxisorientierte Sicherheit für Profis by Marcus Nasarek

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250
Chapter 8
CHAPTER 8
Creating Your Media Library with
Windows Media Player
8
To tell the truth, I’ve never been a big fan of Windows Media Player. It always
seemed to me that the developers at Microsoft were more interested in the device’s
custom visual designs and background visualizations than what mattered most: cre-
ating an excellent media player that works like a media player should. With Win-
dows Media Player 11, though, it’s a different story. Microsoft has reduced the focus
on custom visual designs (known as skins), streamlined the bloated menus, tight-
ened up the interface, and completely reorganized the media library. The result is a
media player that finally:
Makes it easy to organize and find your media
Supports all media types: music, pictures, videos, recorded TV, and other media
Provides professional enhancements for music and video playback
So much has changed in Windows Media Player 11 that like Windows Vista itself, it
seems more like a new program than the same old media player to which we’ve
grown accustomed. Because of this, don’t try to rip or burn CDs without first read-
ing this chapter in its entirety. And whatever you do, don’t give away your original
CDs and DVDs just yet, because you’re still going to need them.
Getting into Your Multimedia
Before you can get started with Windows Media Player 11, you’re going to need to
configure the player for first use. Afterward, you’ll want to familiarize yourself with
the interface and the supported media formats.
Configuring Windows Media Player for First Use
With Windows Media Player 11, navigating your media library is easier than ever—if
you master the subtle changes in the interface. When you first start Windows Media
Player by clicking Start
All Programs Windows Media Player, you’ll have to
Getting into Your Multimedia
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251
specify how Windows Media Player should be configured. As Figure 8-1 shows, you
have two choices:
Express Settings
Configures the default settings you’ll want to use most often. If you want to
change the settings later, right-click the Library button and then select More
Options. In the Options dialog box, select the Privacy tab. You’ll have similar
options as with step 2 of the Custom Settings procedure.
Custom Settings
Allows you to configure the settings to use. This gives you more control over the
way Windows Media Player obtains and stores media information.
You can configure Windows Media Player to use express settings by clicking Express
Settings and then clicking Finish. With express settings, Windows Media Player is
configured as your default music and video player. Windows Media Player can
download CD and DVD information from the Internet, obtain media usage rights
automatically, and send anonymous usage information to Microsoft for the Cus-
tomer Experience Improvement Program.
Figure 8-1. Choosing the initial settings for Windows Media Player
252
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Chapter 8: Creating Your Media Library with Windows Media Player
You can configure Windows Media Player to use custom settings by completing the
following steps:
1. Select Custom Settings and then click Next. This displays the Select Privacy
Options page shown in Figure 8-2.
2. Use the following settings to configure your privacy settings and then click Next:
Display media information from the Internet
Select this option to allow Windows Media Player to try to obtain media
information for the CDs and DVDs that you play. With music CDs, this
allows Windows Media Player to retrieve the full details about the CD,
including the album cover, album title, album artist, and song titles for each
track. To obtain the media information, Windows Media Player sends the
CD or DVD identifier to a database operated by your default online store or
a Windows Media database. The online store or Windows Media database
then sends the information back to your computer, where the information is
stored. If your computer is offline, Windows Media Player stores the request
for media information so that it can try to obtain the media information the
next time you connect your computer to the Internet.
Figure 8-2. Choosing your privacy options

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