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Windows Vista Security: Praxisorientierte Sicherheit für Profis by Marcus Nasarek

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Chapter 8: Creating Your Media Library with Windows Media Player
You can change the way Windows Media Player handles files you play by complet-
ing the following steps:
1. Right-click the Library button and then select More Options. This displays the
Options dialog box.
2. In the Options dialog box, select the Player tab.
3. If you don’t want audio or video files you play to be added to your media library,
clear the “Add media files to library when played” checkbox. Otherwise, select
this checkbox to add played files automatically to your library.
4. Click OK to save your settings.
Ripping Audio CDs into Your Media Library
With ripping, you copy tracks on audio CDs to your computer and store them as
files. Before you start ripping audio CDs, you should:
Learn about the audio formats that are available and then select a default audio
format that best fits your quality needs and the type of audio CDs you work with
the most.
Configure the default ripping settings to specify how music is ripped and where
music you’ve ripped is stored.
Choosing audio formats for ripping CDs
When you rip audio CDs, the audio codec in Windows Media Player works behind
the scenes to convert the encoded audio from the audio CD to a standard file format
that you can play. The audio encoding formats available are:
Windows Media Audio
Windows Media Audio with Variable Bit Rate
Windows Media Audio Pro
Windows Media Audio Lossless
MP3 audio
WAV audio
The sections that follow discuss how each audio format is used.
Windows Media Audio.
The audio codec in Windows Media Player 11 is capable of rip-
ping and playing audio files in Windows Media Audio format. Windows Media
Audio is the default format and the default bit rate is 128 Kbps. You’ll find that this
audio format is best used with stereo recordings.
While other audio formats and bit rates are available, you may be surprised to learn
that Windows Media Audio encoding is one of the most efficient audio encoding
Building Your Media Library
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techniques available. In fact, as compared to MP3, Windows Media Audio delivers
superior quality at a fraction of the bit rate. Because of this, Windows Media Audio
should always be your first choice for audio encoding.
With Windows Media Audio, the audio codec samples audio at 44.1 or 48 kilohertz
(kHz) using 16 bits. This offers quality sound at these bit rates:
48 Kbps
With audio encoding at 48 Kbps, you get the smallest file sizes possible at a
direct cost to sound quality. This encoding uses about 22 MB per CD.
64 Kbps
With audio encoding at 64 Kbps, you get smaller file sizes and a small increase
in sound quality. This encoding uses about 28 MB per CD.
96 Kbps
With audio encoding at 96 Kbps, you get average file sizes and a modest increase
in sound quality. This encoding uses about 42 MB per CD.
128 Kbps
With audio encoding at 128 Kbps, you get large file sizes and a large increase in
sound quality. This encoding uses about 56 MB per CD.
160 Kbps
With audio encoding at 160 Kbps, you get larger file sizes and a larger increase
in sound quality. This encoding uses about 69 MB per CD.
192 Kbps
With audio encoding at 192 Kbps, you get the largest file sizes and the largest
increase in sound quality. This encoding uses about 86 MB per CD.
Windows Media Audio with Variable Bit Rate.
The audio codec in Windows Media Player
11 is capable of ripping and playing audio files in the Windows Media Audio with
Variable Bit Rate format. This format is best used when you want to get the highest
quality with stereo recordings.
Windows Media Audio with Variable Bit Rate enables you to record stereo and even
higher-quality audio at smaller file sizes by automatically varying the encoding bit
rate according to the complexity of the audio data. With Variable Bit Rate, the audio
codec in Windows Media Player increases the bit rate to capture complex sections of
the audio data and decreases the bit rate to maximize the compression of less com-
plex sections. The result is compact, high-quality compression at these bit rates:
40 to 75 Kbps
With variable audio encoding at 40 to 75 Kbps, you get the smallest file sizes possi-
ble at a direct cost to sound quality. This encoding uses about 18 to 33 MB per CD.
50 to 95 Kbps
With variable audio encoding at 50 to 95 Kbps, you get smaller file sizes and a
modest increase in sound quality. This encoding uses about 22 to 42 MB per CD.

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