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Windows Vista Security: Praxisorientierte Sicherheit für Profis by Marcus Nasarek

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Optimizing Performance
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4. On the Advanced tab, shown in Figure 3-21, select “Background services” to
optimize performance for a computer you are using as a server. Otherwise, select
Programs to optimize performance for a computer you use to run applications,
such as Microsoft Word.
5. Click OK.
Fine-Tuning Virtual Memory
Your computer uses virtual memory to extend the amount of available RAM by writ-
ing physical memory (RAM) to disks through a process called paging. With paging,
Windows Vista writes a set amount of RAM, such as 1,834 MB, to the disk as a pag-
ing file, where the operating system can access it from the disk when needed in place
of physical memory.
Windows Vista writes paging files to disk drives as a file named pagefile.sys. Win-
dows Vista creates an initial paging file automatically for the drive containing the
operating system. By default, other drives don’t have paging files, so you must create
these paging files manually if you want to use them.
As with many other aspects of performance, Windows Vista does a much better job
than its predecessors do of automatically managing virtual memory. Typically, Win-
dows Vista will allocate virtual memory at least as large as the total physical memory
installed on the computer. This helps to ensure that paging files don’t become frag-
mented, which can result in poor system performance.
Figure 3-21. Setting the processor scheduling options
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Chapter 3: Fine-Tuning Windows Vista’s Appearance and Performance
You can also manually manage virtual memory. If you do this, you’ll typically want
to use a fixed virtual memory size. You fix the size of the virtual memory by setting
the initial size and the maximum size to the same value, and this in turn prevents
fragmentation.
In most cases, I recommend setting the total paging file size so that it’s
twice the physical RAM size on the system. For instance, on a com-
puter with 1,024 MB of RAM, you would ensure that the “Total paging
file size for each drive” setting is at least 2,048 MB. If your computer
has more than 2 GB of RAM, however, you’ll probably want to set the
paging file size so that it’s the same size as the physical memory.
You can manually configure virtual memory by completing the following steps:
1. In the Control Panel, click the System and Maintenance category heading link.
2. Click Performance Information and Tools.
3. Under Tasks, click “Adjust visual effects.” This opens the Performance Options
dialog box.
4. On the Advanced tab, click Change to display the Virtual Memory dialog box
shown in Figure 3-22. The following information is provided:
Drive [Volume Label] and Paging File Size (MB)
Show the current configuration of virtual memory. The dialog box lists each
volume with its associated paging file (if any). The paging file range shows
the initial and maximum size values of the related paging file.
Paging file size for each drive
Provides information on the currently selected drive and enables you to set
its paging file size. “Space available” indicates how much space is available
on the drive.
Total paging file size for all drives
Provides a recommended size for virtual RAM on the system and shows the
amount currently allocated.
5. By default, Windows Vista manages the paging file size for all drives. If you want
to configure virtual memory manually, clear the “Automatically manage paging
file size for all drives” checkbox.
6. In the Drive listbox, select the disk volume you want to work with.
7. Select “Custom size” and then enter an initial size and a maximum size.
8. Click Set to save the changes.
9. Repeat steps 6–8 for each disk volume you want to configure.
10. Click OK. If prompted to overwrite an existing pagefile.sys file, click Yes.
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11. If you updated the settings for a paging file that is currently in use, you’ll see a
prompt explaining that you need to restart the system for the changes to take
effect. Click OK.
12. Click OK twice to close the open dialog boxes. You’ll see a prompt asking if you
want to restart the system. Click Restart.
You can have Windows Vista automatically manage virtual memory by following
these steps:
1. In the Control Panel, click the System and Maintenance category heading link.
2. Click Performance Information and Tools.
3. Under Tasks, click “Adjust visual effects.” This opens the Performance Options
dialog box.
4. On the Advanced tab, click Change to display the Virtual Memory dialog box
shown in Figure 3-22.
5. Select the “Automatically manage paging file size for all drives” checkbox.
6. Click OK twice to close the open dialog boxes.
Figure 3-22. Configuring virtual memory

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