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Windows Vista Security: Praxisorientierte Sicherheit für Profis by Marcus Nasarek

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Searching Your Computer
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Searching Your Computer
In the “Navigating the Search box” section of Chapter 2, I discussed using the Start
menu Search box. The Search box in Windows Explorer is similar. However, there
are some important differences and many additional advanced options.
Searching Your Computer: The Essentials
The Search box, shown in Figure 6-19, is provided in all views of Windows Explorer.
This means you can search Control Panel, Network, Computer, Desktop, Public,
and Recycle Bin locations.
The way the Windows Search service performs a search depends on where you are
searching. A general search works like this: the Windows Search service matches the
search text to words that appear in the title of any file or file folder, the properties of
any indexed file or folder, and the contents of indexed documents. The automatic
indexing of selected files and folders is a key feature of Windows Vista that improves
the search results and helps to speed up the search process.
With Windows Explorer, you must click in the Search box prior to typing your
search text. This means a basic search requires two steps:
1. In Windows Explorer, access the start location for your search.
2. Click in the Search box and then enter the search text.
The Windows Search service is the operating system feature that performs the
search. Once the Windows Search service completes a search in the selected loca-
tion, it automatically begins another search if you enter additional search text or if
you change the search text. You can stop a search in progress at any time by clicking
the Stop button—the red X on the right side of the Address bar. You can repeat a
search by clicking the Refresh button.
With the Computer view of Windows Explorer, you can use the Search box to search
your entire computer, including all disk drives and all devices with removable stor-
age. To do this, follow these steps:
1. Click Start and then click Computer.
2. Click in the Search box and then enter the search text.
Figure 6-19. The Search box, for searching for files and folders
188
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Chapter 6: Mastering Windows Explorer and Searching Your Computer
With other views of Windows Explorer, the Windows Search service does not per-
form a whole computer search. Instead, it searches only the selected location and its
subnodes. This means if you were to search the C:\Documents folder, the Windows
Search service would search C:\Documents and all its subfolders. It would not search
other folders or other locations.
As Figure 6-20 shows, results are returned to the Results Pane in Windows Explorer
and the Address bar is updated to reflect that you are viewing search results. The
search results themselves are listed by name, date modified, file type, folder, authors,
and tags. If you click the Location Indicator icon on the left side of the address path,
you’ll see the actual search text passed to the Windows Search service. See “Search-
ing Your Computer: Save Search Options,” later in this chapter, for details on saving
searches so that you can run them again in the future.
As you’ve seen, the basics of searching for files and folders are fairly straightforward.
To improve your search results, however, you need to use the advanced search
options and features built into Windows Vista. These additional advanced features
include:
Search options, for fine-tuning the search results
The Search Pane, for filtering search results by document type
Advanced Search, for performing advanced searches using multiple filters
Indexing options, for managing which files and folders are indexed
Save Search, for saving advanced search criteria for future searches
I discuss these advanced search features in the sections that follow.
Figure 6-20. The Windows Search service, which returns results matching the search text

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