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Windows Vista Security: Praxisorientierte Sicherheit für Profis by Marcus Nasarek

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Searching Your Computer
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In Figure 6-22, note that the Windows Search service provides several warning
messages:
The first warning explains that there are too many results to fit in this view.
Because the Windows Search service returns only the first 5,000 matching
results, you’ll see this warning whenever there are more than 5,000 items in the
search results. In this case, you will typically want to try to narrow your search
by entering more specific search text in the Search box. You can, however, click
the warning text and then select “Show all results” to force the Windows Search
service to display all matching results.
The second warning explains that searches might be slow because you are
searching nonindexed locations. If you don’t want to see this warning in the
future, click the warning text and then select “Don’t show this message again.” If
you frequently search this location, you can speed up future searches by clicking
the warning text and then selecting “Add to index.” See also “Indexing Your
Computer for Faster Searches,” for details on customizing the list of indexed
locations.
When you know the type of file you are looking for but not necessarily the name,
you can enter a wildcard character to start your search. In the example shown in
Figure 6-22, I didn’t know the name of the file I was looking for or even part of it, so
I entered
* as a wildcard character to match any name. Since I also knew I wasn’t
looking for an email, document, picture, or music file, I selected Other on the Search
Pane to narrow the search results. This achieved the desired results, because the
movie clips I was looking for were listed in the search results. Since these particular
movie clips were .mpg files, I could also have searched for *.MPG.
Searching Your Computer: Advanced Search Filters
Basic search filters allow you to search your computer quickly for specific types of
files with filenames matching specific search text. Basic search filters are, in most
cases, fairly efficient, but they may not be efficient enough to help you pinpoint a
specific file. This is where advanced search filters come into the picture. When you
want to perform a thorough search based on multiple criteria, you’ll want to use an
advanced search. With an advanced search, you can:
Set the start location as part of the search criteria.
Search for files created, modified, or both within specific date ranges.
Search for files with specific file sizes.
Include hidden and system files in search results.
Search for files containing specific tags.
Search for files created by specific authors.
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Chapter 6: Mastering Windows Explorer and Searching Your Computer
You can perform an advanced search by completing the following steps:
1. Click Start and then click Search. This displays the Search Results view in Win-
dows Explorer (see Figure 6-23).
2. Click the Advanced Search button and then use the Location list to select the
start location for the search. The options available include:
Everywhere
Search all local hard drives, devices with removable media, and connected
network shares.
Indexed locations
Search all indexed locations.
Computer
Search all local hard drives and devices with removable media.
Local hard drives
Search all local hard drives.
Choose search locations
Search specified locations.
When you elect to choose search locations, the “Choose search loca-
tions” dialog box is displayed. The initial locations are the base loca-
tions discussed previously, as well as Offline Files, for searching offline
file locations; Microsoft Office Outlook, for searching saved mes-
sages; and Search Folders, for selecting saved searches to include in
the search. If a node can be expanded, you’ll see an open triangle to
the left of the location name. Click this to expand the location. For
example, you could expand Computer and then expand Local Disk
(C:) to select a folder on the C: drive.
Figure 6-23. Performing an advanced search when you want to search using multiple search
parameters

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