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Word 2000 in a Nutshell by Walter Glenn

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Name

Window New Window

Synopsis

The Window New Window command opens a duplicate of the currently active document. This can be useful for reviewing different parts of a document at the same time. The contents of the two windows are identical: make an edit in one window and the changes appear simultaneously in the other window. Each window behaves like a regular document; switch back and forth between them using the taskbar or the Window menu or arrange them side-by-side on the screen.

There’s no real limit to the number of windows that can be opened for a given document. On opening the first new window for a document, Word labels the original document (in the title bar) as the name of the document followed by a colon followed by a 1 (i.e., Chapter 10:1). Word labels each consecutive new window :2, :3, and so on. Saving any of the open windows of a single document saves the document. Remember that no matter how many new windows are created using Window New Window, you are still looking at only one document.

When running your monitor at a higher resolution (better than 800x600, say), the Window Split command is usually more useful than the New Window command. The Split command is discussed later in this chapter.

Different Views for Different Windows

One great advantage to using more than one window for a document is being able to look at the document in different views. For example, you could view a document in Normal view in one window and in Web view in another. Edits made ...

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