(Ray)
(Fogra 29_WF)Job:08-28858 Title:RP-Writing & Research for Graphic Designers
#175 Dtp:225 Page:8
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(Ray)
(Fogra 29_WF)Job:08-28858 Title:RP-Writing & Research for Graphic Designers
#175 Dtp:225 Page:9
001-017_28858.indd 9 8/30/12 4:34 PM
(Text)
DESIGNERS,
MAKE YOUR
MARK
VERBAL
VISUAL
BREVITY FUNCTION
SIMPLICITY
CLARITY
STRUCTURE
PURPOSE
MANIFESTOS
DESIGN
CRITICISM
TWEETING
TEXTING
BLOGGING
DESIGN
MANUALS
MONOGRAPHS
WRITING
READINGRESEARCH
t
e
c
h
n
i
c
a
l
a
n
a
l
y
t
i
c
j
o
u
n
a
l
i
s
t
i
c
n
a
r
r
a
t
i
v
e
d
i
s
c
u
r
v
i
e
p
o
e
t
i
c
c
r
e
a
i
t
v
e
a
c
a
d
e
m
i
c
b
u
s
i
n
e
s
s
(Ray)
(Fogra 29_WF)Job:08-28858 Title:RP-Writing & Research for Graphic Designers
#175 Dtp:225 Page:8
001-017_28858.indd 8 8/30/12 4:33 PM
(Text)
Toothless cowboys and whiskered prospectors—staples
of classic Hollywood Westerns—could barely read or
write, so they made crude marks in lieu of signatures.
Graphic designers are not illiterate (or toothless) as a
rule, yet according to a certain slander, they have been
accused of not writing or reading. They only make
marks—logos. Logic and a modicum of science hold
that verbal, textual, and other cognitive deficiencies are
precisely the reasons for becoming a graphic designer.
If true, then to find a designer who can actually write
and make marks is nothing short of miraculous.
In a word, nonsense!
So, let’s bury this ridiculous fallacy on boot hill once and for all. Even if the stereotype held for a small
minority who chose art school over a liberal arts college because they weren’t adept “wordsmiths,” any
assertion that this is the norm is untrue. Right-brain/left-brain theories regarding visual versus verbal
fluency are hardly definitive explanations as to why people do or do not become designers. Many visual
people start careers as “artists,” but an equally large number of writers join the designer ranks too. Writing
is design.
Indeed, design “problem solving” requires many word and visual skills; how else can designers make
those proverbial pictures that speak a thousand words? Often an image, glyph, or mark sparks as much
understanding as any combination of words, sentences, or paragraphs—even more so. This accounts for
why designing logos and trademarks is so valuable to business and so lucrative for some designers. Yet
just as often, design is the frame that showcases words, and illustration illuminates them. Today, designers
must master the visual and verbal. With increasing multimedia communication platforms opening all
the time, reading and writing and, more than ever, research (a third imperative skill), are the designer’s
essential three R’s.
(Ray)
(Fogra 29_WF)Job:08-28858 Title:RP-Writing & Research for Graphic Designers
#175 Dtp:225 Page:9
001-017_28858.indd 9 8/30/12 4:33 PM
(Ray)
(Fogra 29_WF)Job:08-28858 Title:RP-Writing & Research for Graphic Designers
#175 Dtp:225 Page:8
001-017_28858.indd 8 8/30/12 4:34 PM
(Ray)
(Fogra 29_WF)Job:08-28858 Title:RP-Writing & Research for Graphic Designers
#175 Dtp:225 Page:9
001-017_28858.indd 9 8/30/12 4:34 PM
(Text)
DESIGNERS,
MAKE YOUR
MARK
VERBAL
VISUAL
BREVITY FUNCTION
SIMPLICITY
CLARITY
STRUCTURE
PURPOSE
MANIFESTOS
DESIGN
CRITICISM
TWEETING
TEXTING
BLOGGING
DESIGN
MANUALS
MONOGRAPHS
WRITING
READINGRESEARCH
t
e
c
h
n
i
c
a
l
a
n
a
l
y
t
i
c
j
o
u
n
a
l
i
s
t
i
c
n
a
r
r
a
t
i
v
e
d
i
s
c
u
r
v
i
e
p
o
e
t
i
c
c
r
e
a
i
t
v
e
a
c
a
d
e
m
i
c
b
u
s
i
n
e
s
s
(Ray)
(Fogra 29_WF)Job:08-28858 Title:RP-Writing & Research for Graphic Designers
#175 Dtp:225 Page:8
001-017_28858.indd 8 8/30/12 4:33 PM
(Text)
Toothless cowboys and whiskered prospectors—staples
of classic Hollywood Westerns—could barely read or
write, so they made crude marks in lieu of signatures.
Graphic designers are not illiterate (or toothless) as a
rule, yet according to a certain slander, they have been
accused of not writing or reading. They only make
marks—logos. Logic and a modicum of science hold
that verbal, textual, and other cognitive deficiencies are
precisely the reasons for becoming a graphic designer.
If true, then to find a designer who can actually write
and make marks is nothing short of miraculous.
In a word, nonsense!
So, let’s bury this ridiculous fallacy on boot hill once and for all. Even if the stereotype held for a small
minority who chose art school over a liberal arts college because they weren’t adept “wordsmiths,” any
assertion that this is the norm is untrue. Right-brain/left-brain theories regarding visual versus verbal
fluency are hardly definitive explanations as to why people do or do not become designers. Many visual
people start careers as “artists,” but an equally large number of writers join the designer ranks too. Writing
is design.
Indeed, design “problem solving” requires many word and visual skills; how else can designers make
those proverbial pictures that speak a thousand words? Often an image, glyph, or mark sparks as much
understanding as any combination of words, sentences, or paragraphs—even more so. This accounts for
why designing logos and trademarks is so valuable to business and so lucrative for some designers. Yet
just as often, design is the frame that showcases words, and illustration illuminates them. Today, designers
must master the visual and verbal. With increasing multimedia communication platforms opening all
the time, reading and writing and, more than ever, research (a third imperative skill), are the designer’s
essential three R’s.
(Ray)
(Fogra 29_WF)Job:08-28858 Title:RP-Writing & Research for Graphic Designers
#175 Dtp:225 Page:9
001-017_28858.indd 9 8/30/12 4:33 PM

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