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XML Pocket Reference, 3rd Edition

Book Description

XML, the Extensible Markup Language, is everywhere: the syntax of choice for newly designed document formats across almost all computer applications. Now used daily by developers, XML is living up to its reputation as one of the most important developments in document interchange in the history of computing.

A perennial bestseller, the handy XML Pocket Reference from O'Reilly has been revised once again to give you quick access to the latest goods. In addition to its comprehensive look at XML, this third edition has been updated with new material on Namespaces and XML Schema--considered among the most important elements in current XML use--along with RELAX NG and Schematron, additional powerful tools for describing XML document structures.

Like other titles in O'Reilly's Pocket Reference series, the XML Pocket Reference, 3rd Edition features a well-organized format that gets right to the point. As a result, it's already won over the allegiance of developers everywhere. If you need XML answers quick and on the fly, this compact book is most definitely the book for you.

Table of Contents

  1. 1. XML Pocket Reference
    1. Introduction
      1. A Simple XML Document
    2. XML Structures
      1. Elements
        1. Productions
        2. Examples
        3. Description
          1. Start-tags and end-tags
          2. Empty-element tags
          3. Element nesting
          4. Structures and relationships
          5. Mixed content
        4. See also
      2. Attributes
        1. Productions
        2. Examples
        3. Description
        4. See also
      3. Text
        1. Productions
        2. Examples
        3. Description
        4. See also
      4. Character, Entity, and Predefined Entity References
        1. Productions
        2. Examples
        3. Description
          1. Character references
          2. Entity references
          3. Predefined entities
        4. See also
      5. Comments
        1. Productions
        2. Examples
        3. Description
        4. See also
      6. The XML Declaration
        1. Productions
        2. Examples
        3. Description
          1. Version information
          2. The encoding declaration
          3. The standalone document declaration
        4. See also
      7. Processing Instructions
        1. Productions
        2. Examples
        3. Description
        4. See also
      8. CDATA Sections
        1. Productions
        2. Examples
        3. Description
        4. See also
      9. The DOCTYPE Declaration
        1. Productions
        2. Examples
        3. Description
        4. See also
      10. The xml:space Attribute
        1. Example
        2. Description
        3. See also
      11. The xml:lang Attribute
        1. Example
        2. Description
        3. See also
      12. The xml:id Attribute
        1. Example
        2. Description
        3. See also
      13. XML Namespaces
        1. Examples
        2. Qualified or prefixed namespace declaration
        3. Description
          1. Qualified names or names with prefixes
          2. The xml: and xmlns: prefixes
          3. Undeclaring namespaces with Version 1.1
        4. See also
    3. Document Type Definitions
      1.  
        1. Productions
        2. Examples
        3. Description
          1. External subset
          2. The text declaration
          3. Element type declarations and content models
          4. Attribute-list declarations
        4. Emulating namespace support in DTDs
        5. Internal subset
        6. Using internal and external subsets together
        7. Parsed entities
        8. Parameter entities
        9. Other things that can go in a DTD
          1. Comments in DTDs
          2. Conditional sections in DTDs
          3. Mixed-content declarations
          4. Unparsed entities and notations in DTDs
        10. See also
    4. W3C XML Schema
      1. Creating a Simple Schema
        1. Namespaces
        2. Named and anonymous type definitions
        3. Varied document structures
      2. Compositors
        1. When anything is allowed
        2. Model groups
        3. Empty content, mixed content, and default values
        4. Annotations
      3. XML Schema Structure Elements
      4. XML Schema Datatypes
      5. XML Schema Constraining Facets
      6. XML Schema Attributes for Use in Instance Documents
    5. RELAX NG
    6. Schematron
      1. Core Elements
      2. Other Elements
    7. XML Specifications
  2. Index
  3. About the Authors
  4. Copyright