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ZeroMQ by Pieter Hintjens

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Development Process

In this section, we aim to describe the actual development process, step-by-step.

Change on the project SHALL be governed by the pattern of accurately identifying problems and applying minimal, accurate solutions to these problems.

This is an unapologetic ramming through of 30 years’ software design experience. It’s a profoundly simple approach to design: make minimal, accurate solutions to real problems. Nothing more or less. Note the stress on “accuracy,” a rare but essential ingredient. In ØMQ, we don’t have feature requests. Treating new features the same as bugs confuses newbies. But this process works, and not just in open source. Enunciating the problem we’re trying to solve, with every single change, is key to deciding whether the change is worth making or not.

To initiate changes, a user SHALL log an issue on the project Platform issue tracker.

This is meant to stop us from going offline and working in a ghetto, either by ourselves or with others. Although we tend to accept pull requests that have clear argumentation, this rule lets us say “stop” to confused or too-large patches.

The user SHOULD write the issue by describing the problem they face or observe.

“Problem: we need feature X. Solution: make it” is not a good issue. “Problem: user cannot do common tasks A or B except by using a complex workaround. Solution: make feature X” is a decent explanation. Because everyone I’ve ever worked with has needed to learn this, it seems worth restating: document ...

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