Windows Me: The Missing Manual

Errata for Windows Me: The Missing Manual

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The errata list is a list of errors and their corrections that were found after the product was released. If the error was corrected in a later version or reprint the date of the correction will be displayed in the column titled "Date Corrected".

The following errata were submitted by our customers and approved as valid errors by the author or editor.

Color Key: Serious Technical Mistake Minor Technical Mistake Language or formatting error Typo Question Note Update



Version Location Description Submitted By Date Submitted Date Corrected
Printed
Page all
The book's title used to be "Windows Millennium: The Missing Manual."

The title has changed to "Windows Me: The Missing Manual" (note that change should be made in the running footer throughout the book).

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 13
The third line of the first bulleted item, "Automatic Updates," did

read: "(see page 116)." Now reads: "(see page 186)."

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 15

The first paragraph under "Games" did read: "You can even play some of these games (Backgammon, Chapters,..." It now reads: "You can even play some of these games (Backgammon, Checkers,..."

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 36

The last paragraph did read: "If the Search window is open, you can click the Internet button shown at the lower left in Figure 2-12." It now reads: "If the Search window is open, click the Internet link (which would appear in Figure 2-12 if you scrolled down one line).

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 90
Insert this passage

Viewing folder contents To see what's in one of the disks or folders listed at the left side of the Explorer window, you can use any of these techniques: Click a folder in the left pane of the Explorer; the contents appear in the right pane. Double-click a folder in the left pane, or click the + button next to its name. The branch expands in the left pane. Right-click a folder in the left pane and select Open from the shortcut menu. A new window opens, displaying the contents of the folder you clicked. (To open a program or document that appears in either side of the window, double-click it as usual.)

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 115

The second bulleted item under "Launching Programs" did read: "Choose a program's name from the QuickLaun ch toolbar (page 79)." It now reads: "Choose a program's name from the Quick Launch toolbar (page 79)."

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 135

The 3rd paragraph under "Hooking up a file extension" did read: "To do so, right-click the file's icon and choose Open With from the shortcut menu. Windows Me presents the same Open With dialog box shown in Figure 6-11." It now reads: "To do so, right-click the file's icon and choose Open With from the shortcut menu. Windows Me presents the Open With dialog box shown in Figure 6-13."

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 139

The third paragraph did read: "After you've unzipped the software, you'll usually find, among the resulting pieces, an installer, just like the ones described in the previous section." It now reads: "After you've unzipped the software, you'll usually find, among the resulting pieces, an installer, just like the ones described in the previous section. Tip: Windows Me comes with its own version of WinZip called WinPop, but you must install it manually, as described on pages 387-388."

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 165
Insert this passage

Burning your own CDs If your PC has a CD burner attached, you can create your own audio CDs that play in any standard CD player. Candidates for this treatment are MP3 files, WAV files, and Windows Media files (.asf, .wma, and .wmv), such as the ones you've copied from a CD to your hard drive. 1. Copy the music you'll want to your hard drive. If you're using MP3 or WAV files, they're probably already on your hard drive. If you're planning to use tracks from a CD, copy them as directed in "Copy the CD to your hard drive," above. Remember that the quality settings you use will affect the sound quality of the finished disc. 2. Create a playlist. A playlist, in this case, is simply a list of the tracks you'll want on your homemade CD. To create a playlist, click the Media Library button, click New Playlist, type a name for the list. Then add tracks to the new playlist by highlighting their names (at the right side of the window) and then clicking "Add to playlist" on the toolbar; choose "Add to [your new playlist's name]" from the tiny menu. The maximum length for a CD is 74 minutes. 3. Choose File -> Copy to CD. Now the Playlists list appears. 4. Double-click the name of the playlist you want converted to a CD. If the equipment gods are smiling, your CD burner now spins into action, and the messages on the screen keep you posted as the CD is created. Tip: If you want to play the resulting CD in a standard stereo CD player, use a CD-R disc (which you can record only once); CD-RW (rewritable) discs play only in computers. Copy the CD to a portable device If you have a palmtop computer that's capable of playing music, such as a Diamond Rio or a Windows CE-based palmtop, you can copy your CD files there. To do so, connect the palmtop, and then click the Portable Device button on the left side of the Media Player window. Now Media Player displays a split window: the left side lists the tracks on the CD, and the right side lists the music currently installed on the palmtop. Turn on the checkboxes of the tracks you want, and then click Copy Music; Windows copies the music you selected to your portable player.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 193

The second bulleted item did read: "When fonts are enlarged, they get ragged on the curves. But when you turn on this option, Windows Me softens the curves (if your video hardware supports 16-bit high color; all modern PCs do). This option affects only icon names, and only when you're u sing large fonts (such as the "Windows Standard (large)" desktop scheme described earlier." It now reads: "When fonts are enlarged, they get ragged on the curves. But when you turn on this option, Windows Me smoothes and softens the jagged edges, using a process called anti-aliasing. This setting works only when you've set your monitor to 16-bit color or more, as described next."

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 202

The 2nd and 3rd paragraphs in the FAQ box did read: "If you have a keyboard built especially for using Windows, you have three extra keys on the bottom row: On the left, between the Ctrl and Alt keys, a key with the Windows logo. Press it to open the Start menu without having to use the mouse." They now read: "If you have a keyboard built especially for using Windows, you have three extra keys: A key with the Windows logo. Press it to open the Start menu without having to use the mouse. (This key is usually on the bottom row of desktop PCs; it may be at the top of a laptop keyboard.)"

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 202

The 2nd column of text in the FAQ box did read: "+D hides or shows..." It now reads: "[Windows]+D hides or shows..."

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 263

The 3rd paragraph under "Opening attachments" did read: "At this point, you can proceed in one of three ways:" It now reads: "If you're reading a message in the Preview pane, click the paper-clip icon in the upper-right corner of the message. From the list that appears, select the attachment you want to open, or select Save Attachments to save the files to your hard drive. But if you double-click a message's name in the list, so that it opens into its own window, you have more flexibility:"

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 379
Insert this new sidebar

Two-Computer Ethernet and Direct Cable Connections If you want to network only two computers, you can do so without having to buy and set up a hub. All you need is a special cable called a crossover cable, which can connect two computers directly. It costs about $10 at your local computer store or online shop; just run the cable directly from one networking card to the other. Everything else in this chapter works exactly as though you had purchased a hub and were using a "real" Ethernet network. There's another way to connect two machines, too-one that doesn't even require Ethernet cards: direct connections. You can create this kind of miniature homemade network only if (a) the computers are close to each other, (b) they both have parallel ports, and (c) you've bought a high-speed DirectParallel cable (www.lpt.com). To begin, use the Add/Remove Programs control panel (page 185) to install the Windows component called Direct Cable Connection on each PC. Now choose Start->Programs->Accessories-> Communications->Direct Cable Connection. A wizard appears, asking if the computer you're using will be the host (the machine whose files will be shared) or the guest (the one that will be accessing shared resources on the other machine). Choose Host, and then click Next. On the next wizard screen, specify the port you're using to connect the machines (from the list of unused serial, parallel, or infrared ports). Click Parallel. Plug in the cable, if you haven't already; click Next, then Finish. The host computer starts "listening" for the guest to visit it. Repeat all of this on the other machine, this time designating it the Guest. Once the two machines are connected by cable, you can open the My Network Places icon on the guest machine; you'll see the shared folders, disks, and printers, just as though they were connected via "real" network. Thereafter, whenever you want to repeat this procedure, just run the Direct Cable Connection Wizard on each machine to establish the connection.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 386

The text of item #3 did read: "(To do so, use the Add/Remove Programs control panel described on page 185, where you'll find an item called Uninstall Windows Me. Click it, then click Add/Remove, to get rid of Windows Me.) Of course, choosing to maintain the older copy requires enough free space on your drive to hold the older Windows version (about 150 to 200 MB). You'll reclaim that space when you either uninstall Windows Me or get rid of the older version (once you've fallen in love Windows Me)." It now reads: "Here's how to proceed, once you've made up your mind: If you decide to keep Windows Me: Open the Add/Remove Programs control panel described on the next page. Click "Delete Windows Millennium Uninstall information," then click Add/Remove. You've just deleted your older operating system, reclaiming about 200 MB of disk space in the process. If you decide to ditch Windows Me: Open the Add/Remove Programs control panel described the next page. Click "Uninstall Windows Me," then click Add/Remove. You've just returned to Windows 95 or 98."

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 395

The text under "Arrange Icons, Line Up Icons" did read: "These commands appear only in windows you've displayed in icon (not list) views. They're both useful for tidying a window filled with randomly spaced icons. If you choose View -> Line Up Icons, all icons... If you choose View -> Arrange Icons, on the other hand, all icons in the window snap to the invisible grid and sort themselves according to your choice from the submenu (by size, name, date, and so on). Use this method to place the icons as close as possible to each other within the window, rounding up any strays." It now reads: "These commands are both useful for tidying a window filled with randomly spaced icons. If you choose View -> Line Up Icons (available in icon views only), all icons ... If you choose View -> Arrange Icons, on the other hand, all icons in the window snap to the invisible grid and sort themselves according to your choice from the submenu (by size, name, date, and so on). Use this method to place the icons as close as possible to each other within the window, rounding up any strays. (In a list view, these commands simply sort the list according to the criterion you specify in the submenu.)"

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 396
Insert before the "Customize This Folder" heading

Choose Columns In a list view, Windows shows the details of each file in Name, Size, Type, and Modified columns. But using this command, you can choose from an enormous list of additional columns that you'd like displayed (in the frontmost window): Company Name, Product Version, Sender Name, and so on. You can also specify how wide you'd like each column to be, and (using the Move Up and Move Down buttons) where you'd like it to appear in the left-to-right order.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 403
Insert these index entries

crossover cables, 397 Direct Cable Connection, 397

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000