SQL Pocket Guide

Errata for SQL Pocket Guide

Submit your own errata for this product.


The errata list is a list of errors and their corrections that were found after the product was released. If the error was corrected in a later version or reprint the date of the correction will be displayed in the column titled "Date Corrected".

The following errata were submitted by our customers and approved as valid errors by the author or editor.

Color Key: Serious Technical Mistake Minor Technical Mistake Language or formatting error Typo Question Note Update



Version Location Description Submitted By Date Submitted Date Corrected
Printed
Page 5
Figure 1, three table names (top compartment of each box)

"county_id", "city_id", and "attraction_id" NOW READ: "county", "city", and "attraction" AND Figure 2, the primary key column of the cd table: "city_id" NOW READS "cd_id" AND Figure 2, a third field "name" HAS BEEN ADDED to the song table, prior to the ellipses.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2005
Printed
Page 7
final code example

... END FROM attraction; NOW READS: ... END casegove FROM attraction; (32/33) Table 6; The following two entries HAVE BEEN ADDED to Table 6 on page 33: %I Hour, two digits, 12-hour clock: 01...12 %i Minutes: 00, 01, ... 59

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2005
Printed
Page 25
Table 3 continued, line 3 on this page

Style 111 assigned to Japanese date format, given as yyyy/mm/yy NOW READS yyyy/mm/dd.

Anonymous    May 01, 2004
Printed
Page 52
Extracting a substring subsection, 1st sentence

NOW READS: "In Oracle and DB2, use the SUBSTR function to extract length characters from a string...."

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2005
Printed
Page 52
Extracting a substring subsection, final sentence before "Tip" box

The final sentence has been DELETED. The last sentence before the "Tip" box NOW READS: "DB2 pads any result with spaces, if necessary, to ensure the result is always length characters long.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2005
Printed
Page 53
2nd paragraph and first code explanation of required arguments

NOW READ: "In SQL Server use SUBSTRING, and all three arguments are required: SUBSTRING(string, start, length)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2005
Printed
Page 100
Last paragraph, 2nd sentence

"You can use the percent (%) and period (.) characters to match any number of characters or any one character, respectively." NOW READS: "You can use the percent (%) and underscore (_) characters to match any number of characters or any one character, respectively."

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2005
Printed
Page 111
final paragraph, parenthetical phrase

(Note that MySQL is an exception...) NOW READS: (In MySQL, whether table names are case-sensitive depends on whether the underlying operating system is case-sensitive with respect to filenames.)

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2005