Mac OS X Leopard: The Missing Manual

Errata for Mac OS X Leopard: The Missing Manual

Submit your own errata for this product.


The errata list is a list of errors and their corrections that were found after the product was released. If the error was corrected in a later version or reprint the date of the correction will be displayed in the column titled "Date Corrected".

The following errata were submitted by our customers and approved as valid errors by the author or editor.

Color Key: Serious Technical Mistake Minor Technical Mistake Language or formatting error Typo Question Note Update



Version Location Description Submitted By Date Submitted Date Corrected
Printed
Page Throughout
all over Safari site

Viewing the book on Safari, the images are very blurry / poorly rendered. This is quite different from the other Missing Manuals on the site.

Anonymous   
Printed
Page Back Cover
the blurb in the green section

last line should begin with 'how'.

Anonymous   
Printed
Page 2
Last paragraph in FAQ All About "Leopard"

Regarding future Mac OS X versions: 10.6, 10.7, 10.8, 10.9...surely THEN Mac OS XI (not 10.10). Therefore text should read, "has four big cats to go"

Anonymous  Jun 21, 2008  Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 3
Introduction

Change: But it's safe to say that practically ever nook and cranny has been dusted off to: But it's safe to say that practically every nook and cranny has been dusted off

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 3
Introduction

Change: making it easy for you to see what's inside. Unfortunately, only a relatively small number of icons appear; when you click a full folder, you don't get to see everything inside it. And the pop-up hierarchical listings of what's in a Dock folder are gone. * The see-through menus are problematic, too. It's hard to read the menu commands when they're superimposed on whatever text is in your open document or Web page. to: * Stacks are arcs or grids of icons that spring out of a Dock folder when you click it, making it easy for you to see what's inside. Unfortunately, only a relatively small number of icons appear; when you click a full folder, you don't get to see everything inside it. Fortunately, in 10.5.2 and later, Apple offers an alternative: simple pop-up hierarchical listings of what's in a Dock folder (see page 126). * The see-through menus are problematic, too. It's hard to read the menu commands when they're superimposed on whatever text is in your open document or Web page. At least you can now make the menu bar itself opaque (page 316).

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 4
Introduction

Change: "Carbonized" software, as described on page 170-don't necessarily offer this feature.) to: "Carbonized" software, as described on page 185-don't necessarily offer this feature.)

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 5
Under "About the Outline" . . . Part 2."

The word "Applications" in "Applications in Mac OS X" should probably read "Programs" in order to be consistent with the Table of Contents, "Part Two: Programs in Mac OS X." Also, page 11: under the sub-heading "Home, End," the final parenthetical entry is missing the closing parenthesis. Also, page 11: under the sub-heading "Clear," a word is missing: "Clear gets rid of the [??] you've highlighted . . . ." Also, page 12: under "Tip," the ref is made to page "9," but I think it should be page "10." Also, page 20: The 2nd sentence of the 2nd "Tip" is missing a word: "If [? you ?] give the menu name a quick click, etc . . . ."

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 7
Introduction

Change: At the end of the book, you'll find several appendixes. They include to: Part 6: Appendixes. This book's appendixes include

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 7
Introduction

Change: Into this list, you can stick the icons of anything at all—files, programs, folders, disks, or whatever—for easy access to: Into this list, you can stick the icons of anything at all—files, programs, folders, anything but disks—for easy access

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 10
Below Figure 1-2

Suggest a Note/Tip advising see www.apple.com/keyboard/ to view both the wired and wireless keyboards.

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 10
3rd Paragraph

In the example of uses for the Fn key on laptops, you state the Fn key turns the up arrow key into the "Home" key, over in fact it turns the up arrow into "page up" as detailed on page 11.

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 11
Subject Clear

Noun missing between "the" and "you've"

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 11
Introduction

Change: Clear gets rid of the you've highlighted to: Clear gets rid of whatever you've highlighted

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 11
Introduction

[insert this after first paragraph:] Note: This embedded number pad doesn't appear on recent-model MacBooks or the MacBook Air. Apple is phasing it out, having made the observation that almost nobody uses it.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 11
Introduction

Change: (In Word, they jump to the beginning or end of the line. But then again, Microsoft has always had its own ways of doing things. to: (In Word, they jump to the beginning or end of the line. But then again, Microsoft has always had its own ways of doing things.)

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 12
Tip at the bottom of the page

in this tip, there is a reference to p. 9, but the relevant information can not be found on that page.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 12
Introduction

Change: The Control key triggers shortcut menus, as described above. to: The Control key triggers shortcut menus, described on the facing page.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 12
Introduction

Change: On laptops, F1 through F4 govern to: On laptops, F1 through F5 govern

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 12
Introduction

Change: You can reverse the logic, too, so that pressing the F-keys usually triggers software functions, and governs brightness and audio only when you're pressing Fn. See page 9. to: You can reverse the logic, too, so that pressing the F-keys usually triggers software functions, and governs brightness and audio only when you're pressing Fn. See page 336.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 12
Introduction

Change: The Fn key (lower-right on laptops and Bluetooth keyboards, to: The Fn key (lower-left on laptops and Bluetooth keyboards,

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 20
Chapter 1

Change: If give the menu name a quick click to: If you give the menu name a quick click

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 21
Chapter 1

Change: If you've read the preceding paragraphs and gone on a squealing delete-fest just to see how much damage you could inflict on your Sidebar, it's time for a splash of cold water. Once you drag the Macintosh HD or iDisk icon out of the top of the Sidebar, you can’t drag them back in. Suddenly you’re stuck with the orphaned horizontal divider, with nothing to divide. The top half of your list is empty. That's why Apple gives you a quick way to restore the Sidebar to its factory settings. to: In the pre-Leopard days, dragging stuff out of the Sidebar to get rid of them sometimes posed a small quandary: Once you dragged the Macintosh HD, Home, or iDisk icons out of the Sidebar, you couldn’t drag them back in. Suddenly you were stuck with the orphaned horizontal divider, with nothing to divide. The top half of your list was empty. In Leopard, mercifully, anything you drag out of the Sidebar can be dragged back in again, including the big-ticket items like Home and Macintosh HD. Even so, there’s a quicker way to restore the Sidebar to its factory settings.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 22
Chapter 1

Old Finder Mode button label added to Figure 1-3

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 23
Chapter 1

Change: the only way to hide the Sidebar is to use the Old Finder Mode button. to: the only way to hide the Sidebar is to use the Old Finder Mode button (identified in Figure 1-3).

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 24
Chapter 1

Change: * Double-click a folder or disk icon on your desktop. to: * Double-click a folder or disk icon on your desktop. * Press Command as you make a selection from a window’s title-bar menu (page 26).

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 25
Chapter 1

Add to end of Tip: (Note the difference from Command-Tab, which cycles through different open programs.)

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 33
Chapter 1

Change: And here's the tip of the week: Double-click one of the right-side handles to make the column precisely as wide as necessary to reveal all the names of its contents. Best of all, you can Option-double-click any column's right-side handle to make all columns just as wide as necessary. to: Similarly, Option-double-click a column's right-side handle to make all columns as equally wide-when you absolutely, positively don’t want any names truncated. And here's the tip of the week: Double-click one of the right-side handles to make the column precisely as wide as necessary to reveal all the names of its contents.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 36
Chapter 1

Change: Tip: Each of the tiny folder icons in this display is fully operational. You can double-click it to open it, or even drag things into it. to: Tip: Each tiny folder icon in this display is fully operational. You can double-click it to open it, Control-click (right-click) it to open a shortcut menu, or even drag things into it.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 39
Chapter 1

replaced Figure 1-13, showing the View Options dialog box

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 41
Second last line of page (in para under bolded "Show icon preview" heading)

It appears that "Figures 1-15" should read "Figure 1-14"

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 48
Figure 1-18 and UP TO SPEED

The equivalent keystrokes are command + → (right arrow) and command + ← (left arrow) in the figure 1-18. Also in the last paragraph of "UP TO SPEED", Command + Option + → (right arrow) is correct. Anyhow the shortcut keystrokes using arrow keys are mistyped successively.

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 52
3rd paragraph from the bottom

Pressing Option key and pointing to a truncated file shows its full name instantly. It does not need to whip the mouse.

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 53
4th paragraph from the bottom

Clicking a Sidebar item does not show always a column view. If it is designated as 'Always open in icon view', clicking it shows contents inside it as icon, but not as column.

Anonymous   
Printed
Page 55
Chapter 1

Replace entire Stacks discussion with this: A stack is what you get when you click a disk or folder icon on the Dock-and it's one of Leopard's marquee new features. The effect is shown in Figure 4-2. Tip: If you press Shift as you click, the stack opens in slow motion. Amaze your friends. In essence, Mac OS X is fanning out the folder's contents so you can see all of them. If it could talk, it would be saying, "Pick a card, any card." Tip: You can change how the icons in a particular stack fan are sorted: alphabetically, chronologically, or whatever. Use the "Sort by" section of the shortcut menu (Figure 4-2, top left). Fan vs. grid vs. list When Leopard debuted, Stacks were not, ahem, among its most popular features. The essential problem was that too few icons fit in a fan (Figure 4-2, top right). Oh, Apple had sort of thought of that-if there were more than a handful of files in a folder, you’d get a grid effect instead (Figure 4-2, bottom). But the grid, too, has limited storage space for icons. (The exact number depends on your monitor size.) In any case, if there are too many icons to display at once, the last icon says, "24 more in Finder" (or whatever the number is). You have to click that icon to open the folder's regular window, where all the contents are available. Of course, you've now defeated the fan’s step-saving purpose. Clearly, none of this was as good as what Mac OS X had in 10.0 through 10.4: a simple pop-up list of everything in a Dock folder. This menu scrolled as necessary, so you could always get to the complete contents of a disk or folder. Better yet, it was a hierarchical list, meaning that you could burrow into folders within folders, all from the original Dock icon, all without opening a single new window (Figure 4-2, top left). People used to stick their entire Home folders or even disk icons onto the Dock, simply because they knew they now had complete menu access to everything inside, right from the Dock. Fortunately, Apple restored the List view option in its 10.5.2 update. Now, in fact, you can choose List, Fan, or Grid view on a folder-by-folder basis, simply by using the shortcut menu of each Dock folder (page 126) or the Options submenu in List view, shown in Figure 4-2. Note: When your Dock is positioned on a side of the screen instead of the bottom, the Fan option isn't available. Also, if you choose Automatic from a Dock folder's "View content as" menu, then Mac OS X chooses either Fan or Grid view, depending on how many icons are in the folder. ECFIS: Ever-Changing Folder-Icon Syndrome In the original Stacks feature, folder icons on the Dock changed to resemble whatever you most recently put into them. For example, a folder might look like an Excel spreadsheet icon, a PDF icon, or a photo-but never a folder. It was wildly disorienting, since you couldn't get to know a folder by its icon. This, too, was fixed in Mac OS X 10.5.2. The shortcut menu of every Dock folder now bears a "Display as" section, shown in Figure 4-2. It lets you choose either Folder (a folder looks like a folder) or Stack (the folder's icon changes to reflect its contents.)

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 61
2nd paragraph

'Add to iPhoto' control appears neither in Quick look nor Slideshow.

Anonymous   
Printed
Page 62
Chapter 1

Change: confident that the Energy Saver setting described on page 326285 to: confident that the Energy Saver setting described on page 326

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 62
first paragraph

A little difference exists between Quick look and Preview slideshow. The latter uses the visual effect of fade-in and out.

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 62
3rd paragraph

Option-Command-Eject can make the Mac in sleep mode immediately.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2008
Printed
Page 65
Note at the Bottom of page 65

The note at the bottom of page 65 states that a "...circled question-mark button <appears> in the lower right corner of each System Preferences panel..." This question-mark button does not appear (on my system at least) in a few of the preference panes - namely Spotlight and Startup Disk. Recommend changing "each System Preferences panel..." to "...most of the System Preferences panels..."

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 65
Note at bottom

The question mark is not blue, but gray.

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 74
Within "tip about renaming icons" in the middle of the page

Your text is: "To force a particular FOLDER to appear at the top of the list view window, insert a SPACE before the name." My comment: This USED to be true and still is... partly. BUT 1. This naming trick works for NY file. Not just folders. 2. More important - this trick is conflicting with QUICKVIEW [activated by space] One trick to getting to a file is typing the first letter of its name. Try this with a SPACE and Quick Look opens the currently selected file... So I would change SPACE into UnderLine or another non-space special character.

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 91
2nd and 3rd paragraphs (page references to Jan 2008 edition)

Suggestion: In discussion of Secure Empty trash, included a cross-reference to srm (Secure Removal) in the Unix chapter. (The medium level description gives detail on secure empty trash.) There does not seem to be a cross-reference in the index, and that would be useful also. (I spent some time tracking down "Mac OS X Security Configuration" on Apple's site.) P.S. There is an interesting white paper on hard drive security on Wiebe Tech's website. http://www.wiebetech.com/whitepapers/Hard_Drive_Disposal_Security.php

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2008
Printed
Page 92
Chapter 2

Change: probably run slower than you'd like because it must be translated by Rosetta (page 11). to: probably run slower than you'd like because it must be translated by Rosetta (page 195).

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 93
'up to speed'

Link to web page for stuffit expander from the Missing CD-Rom link on catalog page doesn't work.

Anonymous    Jan 01, 2008
Printed
Page 95
Second bullet "General"

Maybe a mistake. Jan 2008 printing, OS 10.5.2 The text in the "General" bullet and the text in the "Name & Extension" bullet both say that in this location you can view and edit the name of the icon. I seem to be able to do this only in the "Name & Extension" portion of the Get Info screen.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2008
Printed
Page 102
Chapter 3

Change: you can press Command-Ito open the Get Info window to: you can press Command-I to open the Get Info window

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 102
Chapter 3

Change: Spotlight doesn't ordinarily index it-but you can turn on indexing by using the File->Get Info command on that drive's icon and turning indexing on manually to: Spotlight doesn't ordinarily index it-but you can turn on indexing by using the File->Get Info command on that drive's icon.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 103
2nd paragraph

kind:folder includes kind of volume.

Anonymous  Mar 22, 2008  Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 104
6th paragraph

created:=6/1/08 does not work at all, because of a meaningless equal sign. created:6/1/08 works correctly. An equal sign is not only unnecessary, but also a mistake.

Anonymous  Mar 20, 2008  Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 107
last paragraph

In contrast to Tiger, Leopard spotlight highlights "Top Hit", otherwise the second row such as "Application", "Documents", "Folders" and so on, but never "Show All". To open Spotlight window without clicking, we must use the up-arrow key once.

Anonymous  Mar 22, 2008  Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 107
Chapter 3

Change: If the Spotlight menu-its Most Likely to Succeed list-doesn't include what you're looking for, click Show All (or just press Return or Enter). You've just opened the Spotlight window. to: If the Spotlight menu-its Most Likely to Succeed list-doesn't include what you're looking for, click Show All. You've just opened the Spotlight window.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 107
"Boolean searches"

By default the spotlight search combines each word with AND. Therefore, kind:jpeg AND kind:pdf brings out he same result as kind:jpeg kind:pdf or (kind:jpeg kind:pdf) Meanwhile OR combination of each word springs out the different result.

Anonymous  Mar 20, 2008  Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 108
Chapter 3

Change: You can also open the Spotlight window directly to: When you're in the Finder, you can also open the Spotlight window directly

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 109
"Where to Look" paragraph, 'Note' section at the bottom of the page

The 'Note' box states the following: 'Note: If no folder window is open when you press Cmd-F, this button says "Casey" (or whatever); it identifies your Home folder. That is, Spotlight is prepared to search all your stuff on this Mac.' Actually that is not correct. In such usage-scenario Spotlight identifies folder that has been set up in General section of Finder Preferences. Procedure of defining this folder is described in the 'Tip' box on page 33.

Anonymous  Jul 01, 2008  Dec 01, 2008
Printed
Page 113
Chapter 3

Change: in Mac OS Xes of days gone by to: in Mac OS Xs of days gone by

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 123
Chapter 3

Change: One listed unopened programs until you need them to: One listed unopened programs until you needed them

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 126
Chapter 4

Change: Top: When you click the icon of a folder or disk on the Dock (just one single click), you get this effect: a rainbow that shows what's inside. Click an icon to open it, just as though you'd double-clicked it in a window. You can even Option-click one icon after another, opening them all while the stack remains arrayed before you. Or grab an icon and drag it right out of the stack—into another window, say. Bottom: If there are too many icons to fit in the arc (as determined by your monitor size), you get this grid instead. Alas, here, too, space is limited. If there are more than fits on the grid, click the "35 more in Finder" icon at the lower right. You go to the folder's regularly scheduled window, where you can see the complete list of icons) to: What happens when you click a folder in the Dock? You see its contents in any of three views. Top left: In List view, the folder contents appear as a menu; you can "drill down" into subfolders, and you open something by choosing its name. (You switch among the three views using the commands in the Options submenu, circled here.) Top right: This Fan view is new in Leopard. Click an icon to open it. You can even Option-click one icon after another, opening them all while the stack remains arrayed before you. Bottom: In Grid view, many more icons appear than can fit in Fan view. Even so, space is limited. If there are more than fits on the grid, click the "3 more in Finder" icon at the lower right.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 127
Chapter 3

Change: You go to the folder's regularly scheduled window, where you can see the complete list of icons) to: You go to the folder's standard Finder window, where you can see the complete list of icons.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 127
Chapter 4

Add: New Stacks discussion, continued

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 128
Chapter 4

Add New Stacks discussion, continued.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 129
Chapter 3

Change: In Leopard, folder icons on the Dock actually change to reflect their contents. That can be a little disorienting, since you can't get to know a folder by its icon-it keeps changing! to: In Leopard, folder icons on the Dock actually change to reflect their contents. The Downloads folder, for example, takes on the icon of whatever was most recently added to it. That can be a little disorienting, since you can't get to know a folder by its icon-it keeps changing!

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 129
Chapter 4

Add this new item: * Time Machine lets you start and stop Time Machine backups (see page 126). To find the "Show" checkbox: Open System Preferences->Time Machine.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 133
Chapter 4

Change: Left: Control-click (or right-click) a Dock icon, or click and old on it, to open the secret to: Left: Control-click a Dock icon, or click/hold on it, to open the secret shortcut menu.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 140
3rd paragraph

The explanation of shortcut key of Eject is lack of E.

Anonymous  Mar 31, 2008 
Printed
Page 140
Chapter 4

Change: The iDisk is your own personal 5-gigabyte virtual hard drive to: The iDisk is your own personal multi-gigabyte virtual hard drive

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 141
Chapter 4

Add this line at end of page: You can also get rid of a toolbar icon by right-clicking it and choosing Remove Item from the shortcut menu.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 145
Chapter 4

Change: (That may not mean much to you until you've read about the Ink feature, described on page 605.) to: (That may not mean much to you until you've read about the Ink feature, described on page 606.)

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 146
Chapter 4

Change: * In the Choose an Application dialog box, turn on "Always Open With" (shown at bottom in Figure 5-12). to: * In the Choose an Application dialog box (the one that appears when you double-click a document whose "parent" program isn't clear), turn on "Always Open With" (shown at bottom in Figure 5-12).

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 155
Chapter 5

Insert this tip: If you leave the Command key pressed, you can tap Q to quit a highlighted program, or H to hide its windows, without actually having to switch to that program first.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 155
Chapter 5

Change: But the fastest method is to use the command-Tab keystroke to: But the fastest method is often to use the command-Tab keystroke

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 156
Troubleshooting moment sidebar - end of 1st paragraph

"don't not work" - delete "not"

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 156
Chapter 5

Change: If so, the keystrokes described in this chapter don't not work to: If so, the keystrokes described in this chapter don't work

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 156
Chapter 5

Change: (Lots of Fn details are on page 9.) to: (Lots of Fn details are on page 12.)

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 158
Chapter 5

Change: The third keystroke (F11 is the factory setting) may be the most useful of all to: The third keystroke (F11 is the factory setting) is surprisingly handy.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 159
Chapter 5

Remove this line: (When you first tap F11, even open Finder windows are hidden; at left, you've subsequently opened a window manually.)

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 163
3rd paragraph

The third paragraph says the following about OS X's Spaces: "But [virtual desktops have] never before been a standard feature of an operating system, ..." This is taken directly from Apple's marketing material and is completely false. Solaris came with CDE (common desktop environment) that had virtual desktops on by default as early as 1996 or so. If you really want to split hairs you could say that you had to install the whole graphical interface separately so it is technically not "a standard feature of an operating system." Even so, the first version of Ubuntu Linux, which shipped three years before Leopard, came with virtual desktops enabled by default.

Anonymous  Jul 03, 2008  Dec 01, 2008
Printed
Page 167
Chapter 5

Change: Mac OS X switches to the appropriate virtual screen automatically, and then returns you to what you were doing on the first screen to: Mac OS X switches to the appropriate virtual screen automatically.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 174
Chapter 5

Change: Note: Furthermore, the Open dialog box shows you only icons for disks, folders, and documents that you can actually open at this moment. For example, when you're using GarageBand, picture files show up dimmed. to: Note: Furthermore, the Open dialog box gives you access only to disks, folders, and documents that you can actually open at this moment. For example, when you're using GarageBand, picture files show up dimmed.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 185
Chapter 5

Change: An iPod is an extremely fine music player with enormous capacity. That's because it contains an actual hard drive that stores the songs. But because the modern iPod has a USB connector, it makes a dandy portable hard drive for everyday files, too—not just music. to: An iPod is an extremely fine music player with enormous capacity. That's because it contains an actual hard drive (or a bunch of memory) that stores the songs. But because the modern iPod has a USB connector, most models make dandy portable hard drives for everyday files, too-not just music.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 188
Chapter 5

Insert this note after 2nd paragraph: Tip: As noted on page 12, on laptops, you'll have to add the Fn key to the combos shown here.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 206
Chapter 5

Change: * Search bar. Type a few letters of somebody's name here. As you type, the widget homes in on that person's entry from the Address Book program. If you see numbers at the bottom edge that say, for example, "1/12," then you've found more than one match. You're looking at the first of 12 matches. You can click the little right/left arrows to page through them. Click the circled X at the right end of the bar to erase the box and start over. * Big red dot. Click to open Address Book, with this person's entry staring you in the face. That's what you'd do if, for example, you wanted to edit the entry. * Phone number. Click it to fill your screen with an enormous version of the phone number that you could see from outer space. The idea here is that it's big enough to see from across the room as you dial the number on your desk phone. * Email address. Click to fire up the Mail program (or whatever email program you use), complete with a fresh outgoing message already addressed to this person. All you have to do is type your message and click Send. * Mailing address. Clicking the mailing address fires up your Web browser and takes you to MapQuest.com, already opened up to a map that reveals the pinpoint location of the specified address. Very, very slick. to: * Search bar. Type a few letters of somebody's name here. As you type, the widget fills with matching names from the Address Book program. Tip: Actually, it shows you entries with text that match from any part of each person's "card," not just names. For example, you could type 212 to find everyone with that area code, or cherr to find someone whose name you've forgotten-but you know they live on Cherrystone Avenue. When you spot the name of the person you're looking for, click it to open that person's full Rolodex card. (In Leopard, you get the information right in the widget; clicking a name doesn't open up Address Book itself. On the other hand, you can no longer edit Address Book entries from within the widget.) * Phone number. Click it to fill your screen with an enormous version of the phone number that you could see from outer space. The idea here is that it's big enough to see from across the room as you dial the number on your desk phone. * Email address. Click to fire up the Mail program (or whatever email program you use), complete with a fresh outgoing message already addressed to this person. All you have to do is type your message and click Send. * Mailing address. Clicking the mailing address fires up your Web browser and takes you to MapQuest.com, already opened up to a map that reveals the pinpoint location of the specified address. Very, very slick.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
Printed
Page 215
Under the heading 'Weather'

The reference (Figure 5-29, lower left) should read (Figure 5-30, lower left)

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
Printed
Page 226
Chapter 6

Change: Note: For more detail on configuring your Mac for Bluetooth connections, see page 227. to: Note: For more detail on configuring your Mac for Bluetooth connections, see page 308.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 228
Chapter 6

Change: Creating a Windows disk on the Mac You can even create a Windows disk on your Macintosh. CDs and DVDs that you burn on the Mac, for example, are Windows compatible right out of the gate. Chapter 11 has details on disc burning. to: Chapter 11 has details on disc burning.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
Printed
Page 232
Chapter 6

Change: That second hard drive can take any of these forms: * An external USB or FireWire hard drive. to: That second hard drive can take any of these forms: * An external USB or FireWire hard drive. * An Apple Time Capsule. That's an AirPort base station/wireless network backup hard drive in one, compatible with Time Machine; it's available in gigantic capacities.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Chapter 6

Change: this writing, you can buy a 300-gigabyte internal hard drive for under $90, for goodness' sake, or an external 500-gig drive for $125-and hard drive prices-per-gigabyte only go down. to: At this writing, you can buy a 300-gigabyte internal hard drive for under $90, for goodness' sake, an external 500-gig drive for $125, or a one-gigabyte Apple Time Capsule for $500 (a combination AirPort base station/Time Machine wireless backup drive)-and hard drive prices-per-gigabyte only go down.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Chapter 6

Change: Any time you want Time Machine to update its backup before the hour's up, Control-click (or right-click) Time Machine's icon on the Dock. From the shortcut menu, choose Back Up Now. You can pause the backup the same way-if you need to use the backup drive for another quick task, for example. Choose Stop Backup Up from the Dock icon's shortcut menu. (Don't forget to turn the backing-up on again when you're finished.) to: Tip: And even then, you can force more frequent backups if you want to. Any time you want Time Machine to update its backup before the hour's up, just choose Back Up Now from the Time Machine menulet (Figure 6-7). Or choose Back Up Now from the shortcut menu of the Dock's Time Machine icon. You can pause the backup the same way—if you need to use the backup drive for another quick task, for example. Choose Stop Backup Up (from either the menulet or the Dock icon's shortcut menu). Don't forget to turn the backing-up on again when you’re finished.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Chapter 6

Change: Now click the Time Machine icon on the Dock (or in the Applications folder). Don't look away; you'll miss the show. to: Now click the Time Machine icon on the Dock, or choose Enter Time Machine from the menulet (Figure 6-7, top). Don't look away; you'll miss the show.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Chapter 6

Change: Top: This is the big payoff for all your efforts. to: Top: Choose Enter Time Machine from the menulet. (If you don't see this menulet, turn on "Show Time Machine status in the menu bar," shown in Figure 6-6.)

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Chapter 6

Change: This message lets you decide how to proceed when data on one of the synced Macs is wildly out of sync with what’s been "published" by another Mac. You can merge the information from the two (a great way to combine address books or calendars), make this Mac's data wipe out the other's ("Replace data on .Mac"), or make the Internet-based data replace this computer's ("Replace data on computer"). You can do this job en masse (top)-or, if you click Options, you can make this choice independently for each data type. to: This message lets you decide how to proceed when data on one of the synced Macs is wildly different from what's been "published" by another Mac. You can merge the information from the two (a great way to combine address books or calendars), make this Mac's data wipe out the other's ("Replace data on .Mac"), or make the Internet-based data replace this computer's ("Replace data on computer"). You can do this job en masse (top)-or, if you click More Options, you can make this choice independently for each data type.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Chapter 6

Change: * Workflow control. Run and Stop "play back" and stop the workflow you're building. to: * Stop, Run. These buttons control playback of the workflow you're building.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Chapter 7

Change: Tip: The top 23 pixels of your graphic are partly obscured by Leopard's translucent menu bar—something to remember when you prepare the graphic. to: Tip: The top 23 pixels of your graphic are partly obscured by Leopard's translucent menu bar—something to remember when you prepare the graphic. Then again, you can also make the menu bar stop being translucent—by turning off the "Translucent Menu Bar" checkbox shown in Figure 9-7.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Power Users' Clinic - Beyond the Big Names - second paragraph

The second paragraph reads: "Both also let you specify which program - Mac or Windows - opens when you double-click documents of specific types (like JPEG or .DOC)." This is incorrect. VMware Fusion cannot do this. Here's a quote from a WMware forum admin, which appears as a reply to several open-with-Word-in-Windows type questions: "Fusion doesn't currently support cross-platform file associations, so you can't do that. The developers are aware the people would like this functionality, but VMware policy is to not comment on unannounced features, products, timelines, etc. so I can't say more." Here's the thread: http://communities.vmware.com/message/895461#895461 P.S. If page 298 says ".DOC" shouldn't it also say ".JPG"?

Note from the Author or Editor:
They've added it now.

Anonymous  May 17, 2008 
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Chapter 9

Change: Step-by-steps are in Chapter 18 to: Step-by-steps are on page 539.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 9

Add this tip: Tip: If you've turned on "Clicking," as described above, then the wording of this option changes to say, "Tap trackpad using two fingers for secondary click." In this case, right-clicking is even easier: whenever you want a right click, just tap the trackpad with two fingers! It gets addictive fast. And add this new paragraph: If you have a MacBook Air, this panel contains some additional gesture options—for rotating images (works in iPhoto or Preview), enlarging or shrinking something (Web pages in Safari, photos), or scrolling. Let the little embedded movies be your guide.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Missing DISPLAY control panel description !

The DISPLAY control panel has an option that appears ONLY when the "proper" display is connected. ROTATE ! It allows you to define the display as rotated by 90 degree steps. So you can put your [external] display sideways, or use PIVOT displays. My own display is NOT recognized as "rotatable" so I do not have the exact wording at hand. But this great feature works great.

Note from the Author or Editor:
No remaining monitors offer this.

Anonymous   
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Chapter 9

Change: This is the list of the 19 "system localizations" to: This is the list of the 18 "system localizations"

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 9

Change: If you use a language beyond the 16 in the list, to: If you use a language beyond the 18 in the list,

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 9

Change: Fortunately, Keyboard Viewer lets you see the characters lurking within almost any installed font; just choose a font's name from the Font pop-up menu to see all of its modifier-key characters. (You may have to change the keyboard layout to see all symbols in some fonts.) Alas, this feature doesn't work in a few of the fonts where it would be the most useful-certain symbol fonts like Symbol and Zapf Dingbats. to: Different fonts contain different hidden characters. For example, Palatino contains an a character (pressing Shift-Option-K), but Adobe Garamond does not. Keyboard Viewer used to let you see the characters lurking within any installed font, thanks to a Font pop-up menu at the bottom. Alas, that pop-up menu is gone in Leopard. Instead, you get only a Font Mapping pop-up menu that lists the Mac's standard all-symbols fonts, like Webdings and Monotype Sorts. For any other font, you're out of luck.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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1st bullet

"When you turn this option in..." should (imho) read "When you turn this option on..."

Anonymous  Apr 25, 2008  Jul 01, 2008
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Chapter 9

Page reflow to accommodate new material on page 339.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Chapter 9

Page reflow to accommodate new material on page 339.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Chapter 9

Add this item: * DVD or CD Sharing. This feature was added to acommodate the MacBook Air laptop, which doesn't have a built-in CD/DVD drive. When you turn on this option, any MacBook Airs on the network can "see," and borrow, your Mac's DVD drive, for the purposes of installing new software or running Mac disk-repair software. (Your drive shows up under the Remote Disc heading in the Air's Sidebar.)

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Chapter 9

Change: On multiple-processor Macs, you see a different bar for each chip, enabling you to see how efficiently Mac OS X is distributing the work among them to: On multiple-processor or multi-core Macs, you see a different bar for each, so you can see how efficiently Mac OS X is distributing the work among them

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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7th paragraph

Display (inverted colors) pressing Control-Option-Command-*(asterisk),inverts the colors of the screen Should read: "pressing Control-Option-Command 8" as is illustrated on previous page Figure 9-17

Anonymous  Jun 03, 2008  Jul 01, 2008
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The last sentence in the "Preview as Graphics Viewer" paragraph.

The sentence reads: "You can even open animated GIFs by adding a play button to the toolbar as described below:" I have searched "below" and I cannot find any reference to adding a play button. The View&#8594;Slideshow action does not play animated GIFs.

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
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Chapter 10

Remove this tip: Tip: If Preview seems to be highlighting too much or too little, drag .

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 10

Change: But if the sender used the "Bcc:" field to hold all the recipients' email addresses, you, the recipient, won't see any names but your own at the top of the email. to: But if the sender used the "Bcc:" field to hold all the recipients' email addresses, you, the recipient, won't see anybody else's names at the top of the email. In the "To:" box, you might see the sender's name, or "undisclosed recipients," or nothing at all.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Top of Page

Discussion on types of CDs & DVDs fails to mention DVD+R capability of current Macs

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
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FAQ Box

This isn't an error report but an addtitional tip to this section entitled "The Eject Button that Doesn't" I had the misfortune to having a disk error message tying to load Windows onto my new iMac 7.1. I was stuck with a black screen telling me I had a disk error and the Windows XP CD stuck in the drive, which is a side slot loading one, not a drawer type. The suggestions in this box were unsuccessful (They seem to be aimed more at the drawer type of drive) and there is no pinhole I could discover to attack with a paper clip. Apple Care had the following very successful suggestion: Power down the iMac and then restart while holding down the F12 key until the disk pops out. Which it did, thank heavens! I thought my imac might be lost forever. This is my very first Mac and I have read your book on switching to the Mac Leopard and am now reading the full version to get all the finer details now that I have some understanding of my iMac. Your books are wonderful for the knowledge they contain as well as being a delight to read. I am not particularly computer savvy and your books have been a tremendous help. I would appreciate it if you would write one on iWork 08! Many thanks for all your hard work in providing us with such terrific resources.

Anonymous  May 15, 2008  Jul 01, 2008
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Beginning paragraph in box

The instructions for burning a multisession CD-R state that they also apply to DVD-Rs, too. From what I can gather from Apple Discussions and Disk Utility Help, this is false. OS 10 does not allow multisession burning of DVD-Rs.

Anonymous  May 20, 2008  Jul 01, 2008
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Chapter 11

Change: When parental control is turned on, nobody's allowed without watch the "always ask for authorization" DVDs to: When parental control is turned on, nobody's allowed to watch the "always ask for authorization" DVDs

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 12

Change: Web S ite Restrictions to: Web Site Restrictions

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Page 479
Power users clinic

the item on moving your home folder still has a reference to netinfo manager presumably from the previous edition of this book. Netinfo manager has disappeared from Leopard, so this is rather confusing.

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
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FAQ Box

The section covers how to put an iTunes Library into the Shared folder so other Users can have access to the library Either iTunes has changed OR some additional steps need to be defined When I (the administrator) move the iTunes Library to the Shared folder I can still open that library from my administrator. However, in one of the other User Accounts I am unable to access the library. It doesn' show as a 'shared' library and if I try to use the Option start of iTunes the opening fails for failure of Write permissions. I can get 'sharing' to work from the Preferences / Sharing but the music is only visible when the original User has iTunes running What was missed in the paragraph? Or what is the new procedure Thanks in advance

Anonymous  Jun 11, 2008  Jul 01, 2008
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Chapter 13

Change: AirPort circuitry comes preinstalled every Mac laptop to: AirPort circuitry comes preinstalled in every Mac laptop

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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last paragraph

Surely, Shared Folders can include file by draggging it out of this tile The plus button is sterile because it cannot select it, meanwhile.

Anonymous  Apr 15, 2008  Jul 01, 2008
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last paragraph

The first column is not Shared Items, but Shared Folders.

Anonymous  Apr 15, 2008  Jul 01, 2008
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"Gem in the Rough" Box

You should clarify that if the "Firewall" is turned on (i.e. Allow only essential services), then the firewall denies a network connection to the "WorkGroup". To ensure that the PCs and Macs see each other, set the Mac Firewall to "Allow all incoming traffic" or "Set access for specific services and applications". If the WorkGroup is behind a router with its own hardware firewall, then it is not a problem to turn off the Mac software firewall. See page 494, second bullet.

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
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Note at top

You did not make a technical mistake here, but I wanted to offer this suggestion. Your note correctly states that the Address Book feature does not work in Word or Excel. However, you do not have to type in the fax number by hand. There is an easy workaround: 1. Prepare your fax in Word (or Excel) 2. Choose File-->Print... 3. In the Print dialog window, click the Preview button. 4. After Preview launches, choose File-->Print... 5. Select Fax PDF... from the PDF popup menu. You now have access to Apple's Address book and to all the usual fax sending features. It's an easier process than leaving Word, opening Address Book, finding the fax number, copying it, switching back to Word, and pasting the number.

Anonymous   
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Chapter 14

Change: The TIFF file format is a high-density bitmap-that is, the Mac has memorized the color of each tiny dot in the file. to: The TIFF file format is a high-density, high-quality, uncompressed bitmap-that is, the Mac has memorized the color of each tiny dot in the file. [and add this line:] (They're also pretty big files.)

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 14

Change: Click the element you want to snip it from its background to: Click the element you want to snip from its background

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Note at foot of page

see Appendix E for sources of additional Unix info (should read Appendix D)

Note from the Author or Editor:
This error appears in the note at the bottom of the page, which begins "Unix is an entire operating system unto itself." The last sentence of this note directs readers to "Appendix E" for additional Unix resources. The correct reference should be "Appendix D."

Wm F Seabrook  Mar 01, 2009  Jul 01, 2008
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Chapter 16

Change: The first time you run sudo, you're treated to the characteristic deadpan humor of programmers worldwide: "We trust you have received the usual lecture from the local System Administrator. It usually boils down to these three things: 1) Respect the privacy of others, and 2) Think before you type. 3) With great power comes great responsibility." to: The first time you run sudo, you're treated to a stern talking-to that means business: "WARNING: Improper use of the sudo command could lead to data loss or the deletion of important system files. Please double-check your typing when using sudo. Type 'man sudo' for more information. "To proceed, enter your password, or type Ctrl-C to abort."

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 16

Change: lets you see and manage the extended attributes (AEs) to: lets you see and manage the extended attributes (EAs) [fix the EA abbreviation each time it occurs]

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 16

Change each occurrence of AE to EA

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Up to Speed sidebar; right column, first new paragraph

Delete the 2nd "are" in "Exchange Servers are are"

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
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Chapter 19

Change: To Do items hang out here as well (page 7736). to: To Do items hang out here as well (page 736).

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Figure 19-6

'(page 799)' should read '(page 709)'

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
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Chapter 19

Heading D should say E

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Chapter 19

Remove this paragraph: * Use the Backup command. Periodically choose File®Back Up Address Book. If something goes wrong-say, a batch of important contacts gets inadvertently deleted-you can go back to a previously saved version to rescue the data by choosing File®Revert to Address Book Backup.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 23

Change: See page 434 for details on creating a password to: See page 467 for details on creating a password

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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nowhere

The index lists "Frozen programs, 832-833". If you look on those pages there is no explanation for keyboard control of Force quitting a program with option-command-escape, although that is explained under "Force Quit" on pp. 154-155. If one only looks on 832-33, one might think that the only way out was to force the computer to shut down, rather than just the program.

Anonymous    Jul 01, 2008
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Chapter 27

Change: Command -O Close Window Option-Command -O Close All to: Command -W Close Window Option-Command -W Close All

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 27

Add this line under View menu: Control-command-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6 Arrange by Name, Date Modified, Date Created, Size, Kind, Label

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 27

Change: Copy, Cut, Paste to: Cut, Copy, Paste

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 27

Change: Shift-Command-A...Go to Folder to: Shift-Command-G...Go to Folder

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 28

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Chapter 28

Corrected non-indented subentries

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 28

Corrected non-indented subentry

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 28

Reprint entire index to accommodate 10.5.2 changes.

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2008
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Chapter 28

Change: Dlear key, 11 to: Clear key, 11

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008
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root account

The page number location for root account information is not 567 as listed but 657.

Anonymous  Jun 21, 2008  Feb 01, 2008
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Chapter 28

Change: root account, 567 to: root account, 657

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2008