Managing NFS and NIS

Errata for Managing NFS and NIS

Submit your own errata for this product.


The errata list is a list of errors and their corrections that were found after the product was released. If the error was corrected in a later version or reprint the date of the correction will be displayed in the column titled "Date Corrected".

The following errata were submitted by our customers and approved as valid errors by the author or editor.

Color Key: Serious Technical Mistake Minor Technical Mistake Language or formatting error Typo Question Note Update



Version Location Description Submitted By Date Submitted Date Corrected
Printed
Page xxiv
changed all the instances of "ora.com" to "oreilly.com"

Anonymous    Jan 01, 1998
Printed
Page xv
Tables, line 3: changed "Files Managed by NFS" to "Files Managed

by NIS"

Anonymous    May 01, 1998
Printed
Page 3
para. 2 line 2: changed "International Standards Organization" to

"International Organization for Standardization"

Anonymous    Jan 01, 1998
Printed
Page 6

The fourth line from the bottom of the page now reads: "As previously mentioned, the largest packet than can be handled..." Should read: "...packet that can be handled..."

Anonymous   
Printed
Page 30
Paragraph 3 contains possibly outdated information. It says that

local files that are appended to by NIS maps are always consulted first, even if NIS is running. I would think that with the /etc/nsswitch.conf in Solaris 2.x machines, this would no longer be true (for this particular OS only.)"

Anonymous   
Printed
Page 314

The first sentence of the fourth paragraph now reads: "When badxid is close to zero, it implies that the network or one of the network interffaces on the client, server, or any intermediate routing hardware is dropping packets." Should read: "When badxid is much greater than zero..."

Anonymous   
Printed
Page 400
same correction to "ISO" index entry as on p. 3

The expansion for "ISO" really does not have the initials "ISO." Go fig.

Anonymous    Jan 01, 1998
Printed
Page 411, 412
Added new Colophon after the About the Author section

Our look is the result of reader comments, our own experimentation, and feedback from distribution channels. Distinctive covers complement our distinctive approach to technical topics, breathing personality and life into potentially dry subjects. UNIX and its attendant programs can be unruly beasts. Nutshell Handbooks help you tame them. Edie Freedman designed this cover and the entire UNIX bestiary that appears on other Nutshell Handbooks. The beasts themselves are adapted from 19th-century engravings from the Dover Pictorial Archive. The text of this book is set in Times Roman; headings are Helvetica; examples are Courier. Text was prepared using SortQuadUs sqtroff text formatter. Figures are produced with a Macintosh. Printing is done on a Tegra Varityper 5000. Whenever possible, our books use RepKover(tm), a durable and flexible lay-flat binding. If the page count exceeds RepKover(tm) limit, perfect binding is used. The animal featured on the cover of Managing NFS and NIS is a tree porcupine, a name meaning "pig with spines." Like the guinea pig, the porcupine is not a pig at all, but a rodent. The tree porcupine is native to the eastern United States and northern Canada. In summer it feeds on green vegetation and the leaves and twigs of deciduous trees; in winter it eats the bark of evergreens. It will frequently chew away a complete ring of bark from around the tree, thereby killing it. As a result of such behavior, the porcupine does millions of dollars of damage annually to the timber industries. The spines of the tree porcupine are about two inches long, barbed, and tend to be concealed by the animal's long, coarse fur. Contrary to popular belief, the porcupine does not shoot these spines. The spines are loosely attached to the skin, so when the barb on the spine catches on an attacker, the spine will pull loose from the porcupine. Once embedded, spines will tend to work their way further in and have been known to cause death when they puncture internal organs.

Anonymous    May 01, 1998