AppleWorks 6: the Missing Manual

Errata for AppleWorks 6: the Missing Manual

Submit your own errata for this product.


The errata list is a list of errors and their corrections that were found after the product was released. If the error was corrected in a later version or reprint the date of the correction will be displayed in the column titled "Date Corrected".

The following errata were submitted by our customers and approved as valid errors by the author or editor.

Color Key: Serious Technical Mistake Minor Technical Mistake Language or formatting error Typo Question Note Update



Version Location Description Submitted By Date Submitted Date Corrected
Printed
Page ix
The Rose Cassano bio used to read

She is lives in beautiful Southern Oregon It now says: She lives in beautiful Southern Oregon

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page x
The text used to read

for offering to put me through college; to Bucky VanderMeer It now says: for offering to put me through college. Thanks also to Bucky VanderMeer

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 3
The text used to read

If you haven't downloaded the extension called CarbonLib 1.0.3 (or the AppleWorks 6.0.3 updater, which includes it) you're missing a great thing. It now reads: If you haven't downloaded the latest updater (to AppleWorks 6.0.4 or later), you're missing a great thing. These updaters (available at, for example, www.missingmanual.com) provide dramatic speed and stability increases.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 3
(Update)

Added to bottom of page: (As noted on page 323, the biggest difference is that, under Mac OS X, AppleWorks cant create or play macros.) 19 (Update) The text used to read: Macros can seem intimidating at first, It now reads: Macros (as of AppleWorks 6.2, missing from the Mac OS X version) can seem intimidating at first,

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2001
Printed
Page 4
The text used to read

If you want to import or export files in other popular word processor formats, you must now buy MacLinkPlus yourself. (At the back of this book, you'll find a discount coupon, which lets you get MacLinkPlus Deluxe for $40 - a 60% discount off its $100 street price. Nonetheless, omitting it from AppleWorks 6 is still a stingy move on Apple's part.) It now reads: The latest AppleWorks updater (to version 6.0.4 or later) helps by restoring RTF translation, an intermediary Word exchange format. But if you want to import or export files in other word processor formats directly, you must now buy MacLinkPlus yourself. (At the back of this book, you'll find a coupon that lets you get MacLinkPlus Deluxe for $40 - a 60% discount.)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 6

remove extra period in caption for Figure 1-1.

Anonymous   
Printed
Page 11
4th paragraph

Edit->Preferences->General->Topic->Files, and then increasing... should be: Edit->Preferences->General->Topic->Files (Appleworks->Preferences->General->Topic->Files in Mac OS X), and then increasing...

Anonymous   
Printed
Page 17
Figures 1-7

In AW v 6.2.3 the Tools window has been reworked so everything on the Frames and Tools panels have been combined into one window.

Anonymous    Aug 01, 2001
Printed
Page 19
First paragraph

The last sentence at the end of the paragraph refers in brackets to: (For details, see Chapter 7). The chapter referral has been changed to Chapter 9

Anonymous    Aug 01, 2005
Printed
Page 22
Second bullet from the bottom

The text used to read: www.missingmanual.com: Go to the missing manual Web site and click the AppleWorks 6 button for more templates ... Reference to templates was removed

Anonymous    Sep 01, 2003
Printed
Page 28
Figure 2-3

Figure 2-3 was updated to show the font command on the ruler.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 36
The text used to read

A checkmark next to the name indicates the font you're using. It now reads: (In AppleWorks 6.0.3 or later, you can use the pop-up menu on the ruler instead.)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 36
The text used to read

Choose Text->Size to specify a new size for the highlighted text. Type sizes are measured in points, with 72 points to the inch, but all you need to know is the bigger the number, the bigger the type. "Normal" size for body text is usually 10- or 12-point type. It now reads: Choose Text->Size (or use the Size pop-up menu on the ruler) to specify a new size for the highlighted text. Type is measured in points, with 72 points to the inch. "Normal" size for body text is usually10- or 12-point type.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 43

The font used in the figure callouts has been corrected.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 51
IN PRINT: Tip

SHOULD BE (PER AUTHOR): Added sentence saying this tip works in OS 9 but not in OS X.

Anonymous    Aug 01, 2005
Printed
Page 53
2nd paragraph of Importing and Exporting User Dictionaries

...-- save it as a text file, import in into your user dictionary... CHANGE in TO it

Anonymous    Sep 01, 2003
Printed
Page 57
The Caution used to read

That way, when you change ring to bracelet, the words cringe and caring won't turn into cbracelet and cabracelet. It now reads: That way, when you change ring to bracelet, the words cringe and caring won't turn into cbracelete and cabracelet.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 58
next to bottom paragraph

In "Making invisible character appear" the text said that the reader should choose Edit, then Preferences, then General. Actually we should choose the AppleWorks menu, then Preferences, and then General.

Anonymous    Sep 01, 2003
Printed
Page 69
The 1st paragraph used to read

(if you have more that one section, of course) It now reads: (if you have more than one section, of course)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 69
The Tip used to read

(use in, cc, mm, pc, or pt for inches It now reads: (use in, cm, mm, pc, or pt for inches

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 80
Figure 3-17 caption

The last sentence now reads: To do this, select the topic you want to restyle, choose Outline -> Label Style and choose a style from the submenu of available label styles.

Anonymous    Aug 01, 2001
Printed
Page 348
Figures 12-2

In AW v 6.2.3 the Tools window has been reworked so everything on the Frames and Tools panels have been combined into one window.

Anonymous    Aug 01, 2005
Printed
Page 366
The text used to read

As a result, AppleWorks 6 by itself can save its word processing and spreadsheet documents only in a handful of file formats: the AppleWorks format itself (including previous AppleWorks versions), plain text files with no formatting, and HTML (Web-page format). If you want to send your AppleWorks document to somebody who uses a different word processor or spreadsheet, your options are disappointingly limited (you can use the plain text format as an intermediary, but your bold, italic, text colors, font sizes, tables, headers, footers, and other formatting elements will all be lost in the translation. The Missing Manuals Discount If it's important to you to be able to transfer formatted documents to other people, whether on Macs or Windows, MacLinkPlus is still the answer. Its sole purpose in life is to translate files from one type to another; it's ideal for getting Microsoft Office documents - or documents of just about any file format - into or out of AppleWorks. It now reads: As a result, AppleWorks 6 by itself can save its word processing and spreadsheet documents only in a handful of file formats: the AppleWorks format itself (including previous AppleWorks versions), plain text files with no formatting, HTML (Web-page format), and - in version 6.0.3 and later - an intermediary format called RTF (Rich Text Format). Microsoft Word and most page-layout programs can open (and export) RTF files; most formatting comes through intact, including bold, italic, text colors, font sizes, and even embedded graphics. But tables, frames, and other elements get lost in the translation. The Missing Manuals Discount Even RTF won't help you when somebody sends you, for example, an actual Microsoft Word document that hasn't first been converted to RFT format. If it's important to you to be able to open (or create) such documents, whether on Macs or Windows, MacLinkPlus is still the answer.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 367

The figure was updated to show RTF exporting.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 368-369
The text used to read

HTML The other file-format option available to you when saving word processing documents is HTML, or Web-page documents (see Chapter 10). In times gone by, you might have scoffed at this solution; you might have assumed that the documents you distribute in this format would have to be opened in your recipients' Web browsers, not their word processors. Until recently, opening such exported documents in a word processor produced nothing but a screen full of programming codes instead of the handsome document you saw on your own screen. But modern word processors, especially Microsoft Word, do a reasonable job of converting HTML documents into traditional word processing documents, formatting intact (Figure 13-2). At the very least, your bold, italic, and underlined text, font choices, type size, and other text attributes will come through the translation alive. Microsoft Word (for either Windows or Mac) even translates bulleted lists in your original AppleWorks document. Even graphics usually make the trip intact, but the process requires more effort on your part. If you've embedded graphics in your AppleWorks word processing document, begin the exporting process by creating a folder on the hard drive. This folder will contain both the text (HTML) file as well as the graphics files, which AppleWorks will save separately as individual files (see page 295). Then it's up to you to transfer the entire folder to your recipients. When they open the HTML document, they'll see a document that looks mostly like the original. Paragraph alignment, fonts, font sizes, and a few other aspects of the type may require slight adjustment to match your original exactly - but they'll be viewing a much more reasonable facsimile of your original document than they would if you had exported your original file as a text file. It now reads: HTML The other file-format option available to you when saving word processing documents is HTML, or Web-page documents (see Chapter 10). In times gone by, you might have scoffed at this solution; you might have assumed that the documents you distribute in this format would have to be opened in your recipients' Web browsers, not their word processors. Until recently, opening such exported documents in a word processor produced nothing but a screen full of programming codes. But modern word processors, especially Microsoft Word, do a reasonable job of converting HTML documents into traditional word processing documents, formatting intact (Figure 13-2). If you've embedded graphics in your AppleWorks word processing document, begin the exporting process by creating a folder on the hard drive. This folder will contain both the text (HTML) file as well as the graphics files, which AppleWorks will save separately as individual files (see page 295). Then it's up to you to transfer the entire folder to your recipients. When they open the HTML document, they'll see a document that looks mostly like the original (see Figure 13-2). RTF As noted on page 366, by far the most useful text-export option is RTF, which Apple restored to AppleWorks in version 6.0.3. Microsoft invented this intermediary file format to help move documents among rival word processors and page-layout programs with formatting (even graphics) intact. Being able to import and export RTF files isn't as convenient as creating and opening Word documents directly, but it's a lot less hassle than HTML exports.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 369
The caption used to read

Figure 13-2: When you translate a complex word processing document (left), you're faced with two choices. Choose Text to export a simple text file that contains no graphics, formatting, or other bells and whistles (top right). If your document is destined for Microsoft Word, consider saving your document in the HTML option, which preserves most kinds of text formatting and (if you send your recipient the entire folder) even graphics, all arrayed in a semi-accurate rendition of the original formatted AppleWorks document (lower right). It now reads: Figure 13-2: When you translate a complex word processing document (left), RTF is the best choice. Otherwise, you have two choices: the Text format, which creates a simple file with no graphics or formatting) or HTML. The latter option preserves most text formatting and (if you send your recipient the entire folder) even graphics, all arrayed in a semi-accurate rendition of the original AppleWorks document (lower right).

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 373
The text used to read

Without the assistance of MacLinkPlus, AppleWorks can open only three kinds of non-graphics documents: ASCII Text, HTML, and Text. It now reads: Without the assistance of MacLinkPlus, AppleWorks can open only four kinds of non-graphics documents: ASCII Text, HTML, Text, and (in version 6.0.3 and later) RTF.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 374
The text used to read

To bring Word files into AppleWorks, ask your friends to save them as plain text files; all of the words in the file will come through, but all of the text formatting will be eliminated. If the document contains extensive font and paragraph formatting, on the other hand, experiment with handing off the document as an HTML (Web-page) document, which can include some of the document's formatting (although no such advanced formatting as tables). Once the document arrives on your machine, choose File->Open, choose File Formats->HTML, and double-click the HTML document to be opened. AppleWorks imports the file as a word processing document, doing its best to format the text according to the file's HTML tags. It now reads: To bring Word files into AppleWorks, ask your friends to save them as Rich Text Format (RTF) files; the words in the file, their font formatting, and even embedded graphics will come through alive. (This extremely useful feature isn't available if you're using AppleWorks 6.0, the original release. Visit www.missingmanual.com to download the free updater to AppleWorks 6.0.4, or whatever's current as you read this.) Once the document arrives on your machine, choose File->Open, choose File Formats -> RTF, and double-click the RFT document to be opened. AppleWorks imports the file as a word processing document, doing its best to format the text as it looked originally.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 381
The text used to read

Tip: If you're in a hurry, here are the best two troubleshooting tactics in this entire chapter. First, admit that AppleWorks 6.0 was buggy. Upgrade to the latest bug-repaired version (of both AppleWorks and its CarbonLib extension) as soon as possible (from www.apple.com/AppleWorks). Second, give AppleWorks more memory. You'll find instructions on page 384. It now reads: Tip: If you're in a hurry, here are the best two troubleshooting tactics in this entire chapter. First, admit that AppleWorks 6.0 was buggy. Upgrade to the latest bug-repaired version, 6.0.4 or later (which includes a debugged CarbonLib extension) as soon as possible (from www.apple.com/AppleWorks). Second, give AppleWorks more memory. You'll find instructions on page 384.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
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Page 381
The text used to read

Of course, you may not be able to solve a few of them (that's why bug-fix releases like AppleWorks 6.0.4 and CarbonLib 1.0.4 exist), but at least you'll be able to work around them. It now reads: Of course, you may not be able to solve a few of them (that's why bug-fix releases like AppleWorks 6.0.4 and CarbonLib 1.0.4 exist), but at least you'll be able to work around them.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 387
The text used to read

This is especially true for AppleWorks - if you hear that, for example, a 6.0.3 updater is available from Apple's Web site, get it immediately - and its supporting extension, CarbonLib. It now reads: Sometimes, problems can stem from out-of-date software, particularly when that software is a device driver (the software for your printer, scanner, Zip drive, and so on). This is especially true for AppleWorks - if you hear that a free AppleWorks updater is available from Apple's Web site, get it immediately - and its supporting extension, CarbonLib.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 388
The text used to read

Some have complained about AppleWorks 6.0 being sluggish, even on the zippiest of Macs. As noted earlier in this chapter, the new CarbonLib and Navigation Services technologies are largely responsible. Fortunately, Apple continues to revise and improve these important software components; CarbonLib 1.0.3, for example, makes AppleWorks dramatically faster; the AppleWorks 6.0.3 update is faster still (and comes with the new CarbonLib). It now reads: Some have complained about AppleWorks 6.0 being sluggish, even on the zippiest of Macs. As noted earlier in this chapter, the new CarbonLib and Navigation Services technologies are largely responsible. Fortunately, Apple continues to revise and improve these important software components; CarbonLib 1.0.3, for example, made AppleWorks dramatically faster; the AppleWorks 6.0.4 update made things faster still (it came with an even better CarbonLib).

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 388
The fourth bullet used to read

Along the same lines, open AppleWorks and choose Edit->Preferences->General. Set the number of remembered items to zero... It now reads: Along the same lines, open AppleWorks and choose Edit->Preferences->General-> Files. Set the number of remembered items to 1...

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 389
The last bullet on the page used to read

Via Voice. Version 1.0 of ViaVoice can't transfer your dictated text into AppleWorks 6. You can use ViaVoice while also running AppleWorks - but the "Transfer to AppleWorks" voice command works only with AppleWorks 5. It now reads: ViaVoice 1.0, 1.0.2. The "Transfer to AppleWorks" 1.0 doesn't work unless you rename your AppleWorks 6 icon (in the AppleWorks folder) to just AppleWorks. This fakeout restores function to the "Transfer to AppleWorks" command.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2000
Printed
Page 406
4th paragraph

Page reference to page 174 changed to page 74

Anonymous    Aug 01, 2005