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Bootstrap by Jake Spurlock

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Chapter 4. Bootstrap JavaScript Plugins

The components discussed in Chapter 3 are just the beginning. Bootstrap comes bundled with 13 jQuery plugins that extend the features and can add more interaction to your site. To get started with Bootstrap’s JavaScript plugins, you don’t need to be an advanced JavaScript developer. In fact, by utilizing Bootstrap Data API, most of the plugins can be triggered without writing a single line of code.

Overview

Bootstrap can be included on your site in two forms, either compiled or raw. In Bootstrap 2.2.2, the uncompressed file is 59KB and the minimized version is only 32KB. All of the Bootstrap plugins are accessible using the included Data API. With this, you don’t need to include a single line of JavaScript to invoke any of the plugin features.

Typically, JavaScript lies in a either a separate file or at the bottom of the page before the closing </body> tag. You can either use the src attribute to link to another file, or you can write the contents of the file between the opening and closing tags:

<!-- To reference another JavaScript file -->
<script src="assets/js/javaScript.js"></script>

<!-- To write JavaScript to the page -->
<script type="text/javaScript">
        function js_alert{
                alert('Page has loaded');
        }
</script>

Generally, it is best to include all JavaScript calls into a check that ensures that the DOM has been loaded on the page. If you have the JavaScript trying to fire earlier, it may miss elements as the browser parses the page. With jQuery, adding a check is easily done by selecting the document or the entire content of the page, and then applying the .ready() method:

$(document).ready(function(){
        alert('Page has loaded');
        // Once the page has loaded and is ready, an alert will fire.
});

As mentioned above, Bootstrap has a Data API where you can write data attributes into the HTML of the page. If you need to turn off the Data API, you can unbind the attributes by adding the following line of JavaScript:

$('body').off('.data-api')

If you need to disable a single plugin, you can do it programmatically using the namespace of the plugin along with the data-api namespace:

$('body').off('.alert.data-api')

Programmatic API

The developers of Bootstrap believe that you should be able to use all of the plugins throughout the JavaScript API. All public APIs are single, chainable methods and return the collection acted upon.

$('.btn.danger').button('toggle').addClass('active')

All methods should accept an optional options object, a string which targets a particular method, or nothing (which initiates a plugin with default behavior).

$("#myModal").modal()   // initialized with defaults
$("#myModal").modal({ keyboard: false })        // initialized with no keyboard
$("#myModal").modal('show')        // initializes and invokes show immediately

Transitions

The transition plugin provides simple transition effects. A few examples include:

  • Sliding or fading in modals
  • Fading out tabs
  • Fading out alerts
  • Sliding carousel panes

Modal

A modal is a child window that is layered over its parent window (see Figure 4-1). Typically, the purpose is to display content from a separate source that can have some interaction without leaving the parent window. Child windows can provide information, interaction, or more. I use them as a window for holding slideshows and login/registration information. The modal plugin is probably one of my favorite Bootstrap features.

To create a static modal window, use this code:

<div class="modal hide fade">
  <div class="modal-header">
    <button type="button" class="close" data-dismiss="modal" aria-hidden="true">
    &times;</button>
    <h3>Modal header</h3>
  </div>
  <div class="modal-body">
    <p>One fine body…</p>
  </div>
  <div class="modal-footer">
    <a href="#" class="btn">Close</a>
    <a href="#" class="btn btn-primary">Save changes</a>
  </div>
</div>
Static modal window
Figure 4-1. Static modal window

To invoke the modal window, you need to have some kind of a trigger. Normally I use a button or a link. If you look in the code below, you will see that in the <a> tag, the href="myModal" is the target of the modal that you want to load on the page. This code allows you to create multiple modals on the page and then have different triggers for each of them. Now, to be clear, you don’t load multiple modals at the same time, but you can create many on the page to be loaded at different times.

There are three classes to take note of in the modal. The first is .modal, which is simply identifying the content of the <div> as a modal. The second is .hide, which tells the browser to hide the content of the <div> until we are ready to invoke it. And last, the .fade class. When the modal is toggled, it will cause the content to fade in and out.

<!-- Button to trigger modal -->
<a href="#myModal" role="button" class="btn" data-toggle="modal">Launch demo
modal</a>

<!-- Modal -->
<div id="myModal" class="modal hide fade" tabindex="-1" role="dialog"
aria-labelledby="myModalLabel" aria-hidden="true">
  <div class="modal-header">
    <button type="button" class="close" data-dismiss="modal"
    aria-hidden="true">×</button>
    <h3 id="myModalLabel">Modal header</h3>
  </div>
  <div class="modal-body">
    <p>One fine body…</p>
  </div>
  <div class="modal-footer">
    <button class="btn" data-dismiss="modal"
    aria-hidden="true">Close</button>
    <button class="btn btn-primary">Save changes</button>
  </div>
</div>

Usage

Using the Bootstrap JavaScript Data API, you simply need to pass a few data attributes to toggle the slideshow. To start with, set data-toggle="modal" on the link or button that you want to use to invoke the modal and then set the data-target="#foo" to the ID of the modal that you’d like to use.

To call a modal with id="myModal", use a single line of JavaScript:

$('#myModal').modal(options)

Options

Options can either be passed in via data attributes or with JavaScript. To use the data attributes, prepend data- to the option name (e.g., data-backdrop=""). See Table 4-1 for descriptions of some modal options.

Table 4-1. Modal options
Name Type Default Description

backdrop

Boolean

true

Set to false if you don’t want the modal to be closed when the user clicks outside of the modal.

keyboard

Boolean

true

Closes the modal when escape key is pressed; set to false to disable.

show

Boolean

true

Shows the modal when initialized.

remote

path

false

Using the jQuery .load method, inject content into the modal body. If an href with a valid URL is added, it will load that content.

Methods

The following are some useful methods to use with modals.

Options

Activates your content as a modal. Accepts an optional options object.

.modal(options)

$('#myModal').modal({
        keyboard: false
})

Toggle

Manually toggles a modal.

.modal('toggle')

$('#myModal').modal('toggle')

Show

Manually opens a modal.

.modal('show')

$('#myModal').modal('show')

Hide

Manually hides a modal.

.modal('hide')

$('#myModal').modal('hide')

Events

Bootstrap provides the events listed in Table 4-2 if you need to hook into the function.

Table 4-2. Modal events
Event Description

show

Fired after the show method is called.

shown

Fired when the modal has been made visible to the user.

hide

Fired when the hide instance method has been called.

hidden

Fired when the modal has finished being hidden from the user.

As an example, after the modal is hidden, you could cause an alert to fire:

$('#myModal').on('hidden', function () {
         alert('Hey girl, I heard you like modals...');
})

Dropdown

The dropdown was covered extensively in Chapter 3, but the interaction was glossed over. As a refresher, dropdowns can be added to the navbar, pills, tabs, and buttons.

Usage

To use a dropdown (Figure 4-2), add data-toggle="dropdown" to a link or button to toggle the dropdown.

Dropdown within navbar
Figure 4-2. Dropdown within navbar

Here’s the code for developing a dropdown with data attributes:

<li class="dropdown">
  <a href="#" id="drop" role="button" class="dropdown-toggle"
  data-toggle="dropdown">Word <b class="caret"></b></a>
  <ul class="dropdown-menu" role="menu" aria-labelledby="drop">
    <li><a tabindex="-1" href="#">MAKE magazine</a></li>
    <li><a tabindex="-1" href="#">WordPress DevelopmentS</a></li>
    <li><a tabindex="-1" href="#">Speaking Engagements</a></li>
    <li class="divider"></li>
    <li><a tabindex="-1" href="#">Social Media</a></li>
  </ul>
</li>

If you need to keep links intact (which is useful if the browser is not enabling JavaScript), use the data-target attribute along with href="#":

<div class="dropdown">
  <a class="dropdown-toggle" id="dLabel" role="button"
  data-toggle="dropdown" data-target="#" href="/page.html">
    Dropdown
    <b class="caret"></b>
  </a>
  <ul class="dropdown-menu" role="menu" aria-labelledby="dLabel">
    ...
  </ul>
</div>

Dropdown Usage via JavaScript

To call the dropdown toggle via JavaScript, use the following method:

$('.dropdown-toggle').dropdown()

Method

The dropdown toggle has a simple method to show or hide the dropdown. There are no options:

$().dropdown('toggle')

Scrollspy

The Scrollspy plugin (Figure 4-3) allows you to target sections of the page based on scroll position. In its basic implementation, as you scroll, you can add .active classes to the navbar based on the scroll position. To add the Scrollspy plugin via data attributes, add data-spy="scroll" to the element you want to spy on (typically the body) and data-target=".navbar" to the navbar that you want to apply the class changes to. For this to work, you must have elements in the body of the page that have matching IDs of the links that you are spying on.

Scrollspy example
Figure 4-3. Scrollspy example

Usage

For Scrollspy, you will need to add data-spy="scroll" to the <body> tag, along with data-target=".navbar" that references the element that you are spying on:

<body data-spy="scroll" data-target=".navbar">...</body>

In the navbar, you will need to have page anchors that will serve as indicators for the element to spy on:

<div class="navbar">
  <div class="navbar-inner">
    <div class="container">
      <a class="brand" href="#">Jake's BBQ</a>
      <div class="nav-collapse">
        <ul class="nav">
          <li class="active"><a href="#">Home</a></li>
          <li><a href="#pork">Pork</a></li>
          <li><a href="#beef">Beef</a></li>
          <li><a href="#chicken">Chicken</a></li>
        </ul>
      </div><!-- /.nav-collapse -->
    </div>
  </div><!-- /navbar-inner -->
</div>

Usage via JavaScript

If you would rather invoke the scrollspy with JavaScript instead of using the data attributes, you can do so by selecting the element to spy on, and then invoking the .scrollspy() function:

$('#navbar').scrollspy()

.scrollspy('refresh') Method

When calling the scrollspy via the JavaScript method, you need to call the .refresh method to update the DOM. This is helpful if any elements of the DOM have changed.

$('[data-spy="scroll"]').each(function () {
        var $spy = $(this).scrollspy('refresh')
});

Options

Options can be passed via data attributes or JavaScript. For data attributes, prepend the option name to data-, as in data-offset="" (see Table 4-3).

Table 4-3. Scrollspy option
Name Type Default Description

offset

number

10

Pixels to offset from top of page when calculating position of scroll.

The offset option is handy when you are using a fixed navbar. You will want to offset the scroll by about 50 pixels so that it reads at the correct time (see Table 4-4).

Event

Table 4-4. Scrollspy event
Event Description

activate

This event fires whenever a new item becomes activated by the scrollspy.

Toggleable Tabs

Tabbable tabs were introduced in Chapter 3. By combining a few data attributes, you can easily create a tabbed interface (Figure 4-4). To do so, create the nav interface, and then wrap the content of the tabs inside a <div> with a class of .tab-content:

<ul class="nav nav-tabs">
    <li><a href="#home" data-toggle="tab">Home</a></li>
        <li><a href="#profile" data-toggle="tab">Profile</a></li>
        <li><a href="#messages" data-toggle="tab">Messages</a></li>
        <li><a href="#settings" data-toggle="tab">Settings</a></li>
</ul>

<div class="tab-content">
        <div class="tab-pane active" id="home">...</div>
        <div class="tab-pane" id="profile">...</div>
        <div class="tab-pane" id="messages">...</div>
        <div class="tab-pane" id="settings">...</div>
</div>
Toggleable tabs
Figure 4-4. Toggleable tabs

Usage

To enable the tabs, you can use the Bootstrap Data API or use JavaScript directly. With the Data API, you need to add data-toggle to the anchors. The anchor targets will activate the element that has the .tab-pane class and relative ID. Alternatively, data-target="" may be used instead of href="#" to apply the same action. Here is one way to enable tabs:

 $('#myTab a').click(function (e) {
        e.preventDefault();
        $(this).tab('show');
})

Here’s an example of different ways to activate tabs:

$('#myTab a[href="#profile"]').tab('show'); // Select tab by name
$('#myTab a:first').tab('show'); // Select first tab
$('#myTab a:last').tab('show'); // Select last tab
$('#myTab li:eq(2) a').tab('show'); // Select third tab (0-indexed)

Events

Tabs panes have two different events that can be hooked into, as shown in Table 4-5.

Table 4-5. Toggleable tab events
Event Description

show

This event fires on tab show, but before the new tab has been shown. Use event.target and event.relatedTarget to target the active tab and the previous active tab (if available), respectively.

shown

This event fires on tab show after a tab has been shown. Use event.target and event.relatedTarget to target the active tab and the previous active tab (if available), respectively.

Here’s a code example of a shown method:

$('a[data-toggle="tab"]').on('shown', function (e) {
        e.target // activated tab
        e.relatedTarget // previous tab
})

For information about the .on method, refer to the jQuery website.

Tooltips

Tooltips (Figure 4-5) are useful when you need to describe a link or (used in conjunction with the <abbr> tag) provide the definition of an abbreviation. The plugin was originally based on the jQuery.tipsy plugin written by Jason Frame. Tooltips have since been updated to work without images, animate with a CSS animation, and work with the Bootstrap JavaScript API.

Tooltip placement
Figure 4-5. Tooltip placement

Usage

To add a tooltip, add rel="tooltip" to an anchor tag. The title of the anchor will be the text of a tooltip. The following two examples show how to do this in the Bootstrap Data API and JavaScript, respectively:

<a href="#" rel="tooltip" title="This is the tooltip">Tooltip Example</a>
$('#example').tooltip(options)

Options

Like all of the plugins, there are options that can be added via the Bootstrap Data API or invoked via JavaScript. All options need to have data- prepended to them. So, the title option would become data-title (see Table 4-6).

Table 4-6. Tooltip options
Name Type Default Description

animation

Boolean

true

Applies a CSS fade transition to the tooltip.

html

Boolean

false

Inserts HTML into the tooltip. If false, jQuery’s text method will be used to insert content into the dom. Use text if you’re worried about XSS attacks.

placement

string/function

‘top’

Specifies how to position the tooltip (i.e., top, bottom, left, or right).

selector

string

false

If a selector is provided, tooltip objects will be delegated to the specified targets.

title

string/function

''

The title option is the default title value if the title attribute isn’t present.

trigger

string

‘hover’

Defines how the tooltip is triggered: click, hover, focus, or manually.

delay

number/object

0

Delays showing and hiding the tooltip in ms—does not apply to manual trigger type. If a number is supplied, delay is applied to both hide/show. Object structure is: delay: { show: 500, hide: 100 }

Methods

Here are some useful methods for tooltips.

Options

Attaches a tooltip handler to an element collection:

$().tooltip(options)

Show

Reveals an element’s tooltip:

$('#element').tooltip('show')

Hide

Hides an element’s tooltip:

$('#element').tooltip('hide')

Toggle

Toggles an element’s tooltip:

$('#element').tooltip('toggle')

Destroy

Hides and destroys an element’s tooltip:

$('#element').tooltip('destroy')

Popover

The popover (see Figure 4-6) is a sibling of the tooltip, offering an extended view complete with a heading. For the popover to activate, a user just needs to hover the cursor over the element. The content of the popover can be populated entirely using the Bootstrap Data API. This method requires a tooltip.

Popover placement
Figure 4-6. Popover placement

Use the following code for popover placement:

<a href="#" class="btn" rel="popover" title="Using Popover"
data-content="Just add content to the data-content attribute.">Click Me!</a>

Usage

To enable the popover with JavaScript, use the .popover() function, passing in any options that you might need:

$('#example').popover(options)

Options

All options can be passed via the Bootstrap Data API, or directly with JavaScript (see Table 4-7).

Table 4-7. Popover options
Name Type DefaultDescription

animation

Boolean

true

Applies a CSS fade transition to the tooltip.

html

Boolean

false

Inserts HTML into the popover. If false, jQuery’s text method will be used to insert content into the dom. Use text if you’re worried about XSS attacks.

placement

string

function

right

Specifies how to position the popover (i.e., top, bottom, left, right)

selector

string

false

If a selector is provided, tooltip objects will be delegated to the specified targets.

trigger

string

click

How the popover is triggered (i.e., click, hover, focus, manual)

title

string

function

''

Default title value if title attribute isn’t present

content

string

function

''

Default content value if data-content attribute isn’t present

delay

number

object

0

Delays showing and hiding the popover in ms—does not apply to manual trigger type. If a number is supplied, delay is applied to both hide/show. Object structure is: delay: {show: 500, hide: 100 }.

Methods

Here are some useful methods for popovers.

Options

Initializes popovers for an element collection:

$().popover(options)

Show

Reveals an element’s popover:

$('#element').popover('show')

Hide

Hides an element’s popover:

$('#element').popover('hide')

Toggle

Toggles an element’s popover:

$('#element').popover('toggle')

Destroy

Hides and destroys an element’s popover:

$('#element').popover('destroy')

Alerts

With the Data API, it is easy to add dismiss functionality to alert messages (Figure 4-7).

Error alert message
Figure 4-7. Error alert message

Usage

You can close an alert manually with the JavaScript .alert() method or use data attributes in conjunction with an anchor or button.

Here is how to dismiss via JavaScript:

$(".alert").alert()

Here is how to dismiss via Data API:

<a class="close" data-dismiss="alert" href="#">&times;</a>

Close Method

To enable all alerts to be closed, add the following method. To enable alerts to animate out when closed, make sure they have the .fade and .in class already applied to them.

$(".alert").alert('close')

Events

There are two events that can be tied to Bootstrap’s alert class as shown in Table 4-8.

Table 4-8. Alert class events
Event Description

close

This event fires immediately when the close instance method is called.

closed

This event is fired when the alert has been closed (will wait for CSS transitions to complete).

As an example, if you wanted to trigger a function after an alert has closed, you could use this function:

$('#my-alert').bind('closed', function () {
  // do something…
})

Buttons

Buttons were introduced in Chapter 3. With Bootstrap, you don’t need to do anything to make them work as links or as buttons in forms. With this plugin you can add in some interaction, such as loading states or button groups with toolbar-like functionality.

Loading State

To add a loading state to a button (shown in Figure 4-8), simply add data-loading-text="Loading..." as an attribute to the button:

<button type="button" class="btn btn-primary" data-loading-text="Loading...">
Submit!</button>

When the button is clicked, the .disabled class is added, giving the appearance that it can no longer be clicked.

Loading button
Figure 4-8. Loading button

Single Toggle

When clicking on a button with the data-toggle="button" attribute (Figure 4-9), a class of .active is added:

<button type="button" class="btn btn-primary" data-toggle="button">Toggle
</button>
Toggle button
Figure 4-9. Toggle button

Checkbox Buttons

Buttons can work like checkboxes (as in Figure 4-10), allowing a user to select many of the options in a button group. To add this function, add data-toggle="buttons-checkbox" for checkbox style toggling on .btn-group:

<div class="btn-group" data-toggle="buttons-checkbox">
  <button type="button" class="btn btn-primary">Left</button>
  <button type="button" class="btn btn-primary">Middle</button>
  <button type="button" class="btn btn-primary">Right</button>
</div>
Checkbox buttons
Figure 4-10. Checkbox buttons

Radio Buttons

Radio buttons (Figure 4-11) function similarily to checkboxes. The primary difference is that a radio button doesn’t allow for multiple selections—only one button in the group can be selected. To add radio-style toggling on btn-group, add data-toggle="buttons-radio":

<div class="btn-group" data-toggle="buttons-radio">
  <button type="button" class="btn btn-primary">Left</button>
  <button type="button" class="btn btn-primary">Middle</button>
  <button type="button" class="btn btn-primary">Right</button>
</div>
Radio buttons
Figure 4-11. Radio buttons

Usage

The .button method can be applied to any class or ID. To enable all buttons in the .nav-tabs via JavaScript, add the following code:

$('.nav-tabs').button()

Methods

The following methods are useful to use with buttons.

Toggle

Toggles push state. Gives the button the appearance that it has been activated:

$().button('toggle')

Loading

When loading, the button is disabled and the text is changed to the option from the data-loading-text attribute:

<button type="button" class="btn" data-loading-text="loading stuff..." >...
</button>

Reset

Resets button state, bringing the original content back to the text. This method is useful when you need to return the button back to the primary state:

$().button('reset')

String

String in this method is referring to any string declared by the user:

$().button('string')

To reset the button state and bring in new content, use the string method:

<button type="button" class="btn" data-complete-text="finished!" >...</button>

<script>
  $('.btn').button('complete')
</script>

Collapse

The collapse plugin makes it easy to make collapsing divisions of the page (see Figure 4-12). Whether you use it to build accordion navigation or content boxes, it allows for a lot of content options.

Accordion
Figure 4-12. Accordion

The following code creates collapsible groups:

<div class="accordion" id="accordion2">
  <div class="accordion-group">
    <div class="accordion-heading">
      <a class="accordion-toggle" data-toggle="collapse" data-parent="#accordion2"
      href="#collapseOne">
        Collapsible Group Item #1
      </a>
    </div>
    <div id="collapseOne" class="accordion-body collapse in">
      <div class="accordion-inner">
        Anim pariatur cliche...
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>
  <div class="accordion-group">
    <div class="accordion-heading">
      <a class="accordion-toggle" data-toggle="collapse" data-parent="#accordion2"
      href="#collapseTwo">
        Collapsible Group Item #2
      </a>
    </div>
    <div id="collapseTwo" class="accordion-body collapse">
      <div class="accordion-inner">
        Anim pariatur cliche...
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>
...

You can also use the data attributes to make all content collapsible:

<button type="button" class="btn btn-danger" data-toggle="collapse"
data-target="#demo">
  simple collapsible
</button>

<div id="demo" class="collapse in"></div>

Usage

Via data attributes

Like all of the plugins that use the Data API, you can add all needed markup without writing any JavaScript. Add data-toggle="collapse" and a data-target to the element to automatically assign control of a collapsible element. The data-target attribute will accept a CSS selector to apply the collapse to. Be sure to add the class .collapse to the collapsible element. If you’d like it to default open, include the additional class .in.

To add accordion-like group management to a collapsible control, add the data attribute data-parent="#selector".

Via JavaScript

The collapse method can activated with JavaScript as well:

$(".collapse").collapse()

Options

The options listed in Table 4-9 can be passed via data attributes or with JavaScript.

Table 4-9. Collapse options
Name Type Default Description

parent

selector

false

If selector, then all collapsible elements under the specified parent will be closed when this collapsible item is shown. (Similar to traditional accordion behavior.)

toggle

Boolean

true

Toggles the collapsible element on invocation.

Methods

The following methods are useful to use with collapsible elements.

Options

Activates your content as a collapsible element. Accepts an optional options object:

.collapse(options)

Toggle

Toggles a collapsible element to shown or hidden:

$('#myCollapsible').collapse({
  toggle: false
})
.collapse('toggle')

Show

Shows a collapsible element:

.collapse('show')

Hide

Hides a collapsible element:

.collapse('hide')

Events

There are four events that can be hooked into with the collapse plugin, described in Table 4-10.

Table 4-10. Collapse events
Event Description

show

This event fires immediately when the show instance method is called.

shown

This event is fired when a collapse element has been made visible to the user (will wait for CSS transitions to complete).

hide

This event is fired immediately when the hide method has been called.

hidden

This event is fired when a collapse element has been hidden from the user (will wait for CSS transitions to complete).

After a <div> has been collapsed, you could use the following code to execute a function:

$('#myCollapsible').on('hidden', function () {
  // do something…
})

The Bootstrap carousel (Figure 4-13) is a flexible, responsive way to add a slider to your site. In addition to being responsive, the content is flexible enough to allow images, iframes, videos, or just about any type of content that you might want.

Carousel
Figure 4-13. Carousel

The following code creates the Bootstrap carousel:

<div id="myCarousel" class="carousel slide">
  <!-- Carousel items -->
  <div class="carousel-inner">
    <div class="active item"></div>
    <div class="item"></div>
    <div class="item"></div>
  </div>
  <!-- Carousel nav -->
  <a class="carousel-control left" href="#myCarousel" data-slide="prev">&lsaquo;</a>
  <a class="carousel-control right" href="#myCarousel" data-slide="next">&rsaquo;</a>
</div>

Usage

To implement the carousel, you just need to add the code with the markup above. There is no need for data attributes, just simple class-based development. You can manually call the carousel with JavaScript, using the following code:

$('.carousel').carousel()

Options

Options can be passed through data attributes or through JavaScript. The options are listed in Table 4-11.

Table 4-11. Carousel options
Name Type Default Description

interval

number

5000

The amount of time to delay between automatically cycling an item. If false, carousel will not automatically cycle.

pause

string

“hover”

Pauses the cycling of the carousel on mouseenter and resumes the cycling of the carousel on mouseleave.

Methods

The following methods are useful carousel code.

Options

Initializes the carousel with an optional options object and starts cycling through items:

$('.carousel').carousel({
  interval: 2000
})

Cycle

Cycles through the carousel items from left to right:

.carousel('cycle')

Pause

Stops the carousel from cycling through items:

.carousel('pause')

Number

Cycles the carousel to a particular frame (0-based, similar to an array):

.carousel('number')

Prev

Cycles to the previous item:

.carousel('prev')

Next

Cycles to the next item:

.carousel('next')

Events

The carousel has two events that can be hooked into, described in Table 4-12:

Table 4-12. Carousel events
Event Description

slide

This event fires immediately when the slide instance method is invoked.

slid

This event is fired when the carousel has completed its slide transition.

Typeahead

Typeahead allows you to easily create typeahead inputs in forms (Figure 4-14). For example, you could preload states in a state field or, with some JavaScript, get search results using some AJAX calls.

Typeahead
Figure 4-14. Typeahead

Usage

Using Data API, you can add sources via the data-source attribute. Items should be listed in either a JSON array or a function:

<input
        type="text"
        class="span3"
        data-provide="typeahead"
        data-items="4"
        data-source="[
                'Alabama',
                'Alaska',
                'Arizona',
                'Arkansas',
                'California',
                ...
                ]"
>

To call directly with JavaScript, use the following method:

$('.typeahead').typeahead()

Options

Table 4-13 shows a list of options.

Table 4-13. Carousel options
Name Type Default Description

source

array, function

[ ]

The data source to query against. May be an array of strings or a function. The function is passed through two arguments: the query value in the input field and the process callback. The function may be used synchronously by returning the data source directly or asynchronously via the process callback’s single argument.

items

number

8

The maximum number of items to display in the dropdown.

minLength

number

1

The minimum character length needed before triggering autocomplete suggestions.

matcher

function

case insensitive

The method used to determine if a query matches an item. Accepts a single argument, the item against which to test the query. Accesses the current query with this.query. Return a Boolean true if query is a match.

sorter

function

exact match, case sensitive, case insensitive

Method used to sort autocomplete results. Accepts a single argument item and has the scope of the typeahead instance. Reference the current query with this.query.

updater

function

returns selected item

The method used to return the selected item. Accepts a single argument item and has the scope of the typeahead instance.

highlighter

function

highlights all default matches

Method used to highlight autocomplete results. Accepts a single argument item and has the scope of the typeahead instance. Should return HTML.

Affix

The affix plugin allows a <div> to become affixed to a location on the page. A common example of this is social icons. They will start in a location, but as the page hits a certain mark, the <div> will become locked in place and will stop scrolling with the rest of the page.

Usage

To apply the affix plugin to a <div>, you can use either data attributes, or you can use JavaScript directly. Note that you must position the element so that it can be affixed to the page. Position is controlled by the data-spy attribute, using either affix, affix-top, or affix-bottom. You then use the data-offset to calculate the position of the scroll.

<div data-spy="affix" data-offset-top="200">
        ...
</div>

Option

Name Type Default Description

offset

number/function/object

10

Pixels to offset from screen when calculating position of scroll. If a single number is provided, the offset will be applied in both top and left directions. To listen for a single direction or multiple unique offsets, just provide an object offset: { x: 10 }. Use a function when you need to dynamically provide an offset (useful for some responsive designs).

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